Projects

 

PBSC Osgoode works with a variety of partner organizations to ensure Osgoode students can build their skills and experience in service of the public interest. Pro bono law projects are an essential tool in improving access to justice and advancing social progress. As well, pro bono projects offer students opportunities to explore a diversity of legal interests and areas, beyond the classroom.

These are volunteer-based projects, reflecting the unpaid nature of professional pro bono work. Applications open on September 3, 2021, and will close on September 17, 2021.

Please refer to the Applying & Deadlines page for application instructions.

Please note if your project requires a work plan, student(s) must reach out to the lawyer supervisor, draft a work plan, and submit it by email to the Program Coordinator and the lawyer supervisor by November 1st at the latest. A sample work plan can be found here, and work plan template can be found here.

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Project Area(s) of Law Number of Positions Type of Work Restrictions Virtual Placement Work Plan Website About the Organization Project Description Student Role
Afghan Women’s Organization Immigration and Family Law Public Legal Education Project Family, Immigration & Refugee 2 Public Legal Education N/A Yes No https://afghanwomen.org/ AWO works with refugees and immigrants, particularly those who have experienced wars and persecution, with a special focus on women and their families. Its mission is to improve their quality of life and to promote their social and economic inclusion in order to enable them to become contributing members of society and to live in dignity. For over 30 years, the Afghan Women’s Organization Refugee and Immigrant Services (AWO) has provided multiple services, including settlement services to all newcomers, with a special focus on women, their families, refugees and people who have experienced war and persecution. The AWO has welcomed newcomers from around the world, including Central Asia, the Middle East, South Asia, East Asia, Eastern Europe, and Africa, assisting them in the first stages of their settlement process. These first steps taken by newcomers, finding a home, work, learning English, and finding out about Canada’s legal system and health care are all crucial to ensuring that each newcomer has a foundation for building a healthy life in Canada.

The AWO also has a private sponsorship of refugee program under which we have sponsored and brought over 5,000 refugees since the inception of the program and have provided emotional support, settlement services and ensured that their financial and non-financial needs have been met. In addition to settlement services that the AWO provides to clients in Canada, the AWO also advocates for the rights of refugees and has been advocating for the human rights of Afghan women and girls.

The AWO has conducted a needs assessment to identify and address knowledge gaps related to various legal fields for newcomers. The current priority need is in the areas of immigration law and family law. The AWO is seeking students to help create and provide legal education in the form of presentations, workshops, webinars, recorded videos, social media/blog posts and plain language resources.

Students will conduct legal research on assigned areas of law to create legal education tools (i.e. videos, presentations, pamphlets, etc.) on immigration and family law topics such as wills and estates, permeant residence status, family reunification, parental custody, and other topics as they arise.

Students may have the opportunity to present this information virtually while being accompanied by the lawyer supervisor. If the lawyer is unable to attend, students will take note of any questions and send them to the Lawyer Supervisor to be answered.

Afghan Women’s Organization International Stakeholders Advocacy and Policy Paper Project Human Rights 2 Legal Research & Writing N/A Yes Yes https://afghanwomen.org/ AWO works with refugees and immigrants, particularly those who have experienced wars and persecution, with a special focus on women and their families. Its mission is to improve their quality of life and to promote their social and economic inclusion in order to enable them to become contributing members of society and to live in dignity. For over 30 years, the Afghan Women’s Organization Refugee and Immigrant Services (AWO) has provided multiple services, including settlement services to all newcomers, with a special focus on women, their families, refugees and people who have experienced war and persecution. The AWO has welcomed newcomers from around the world, including Central Asia, the Middle East, South Asia, East Asia, Eastern Europe, and Africa, assisting them in the first stages of their settlement process. These first steps taken by newcomers, finding a home, work, learning English, and finding out about Canada’s legal system and health care are all crucial to ensuring that each newcomer has a foundation for building a healthy life in Canada.

The AWO also has a private sponsorship of refugee program under which we have sponsored and brought over 5,000 refugees since the inception of the program and have provided emotional support, settlement services and ensured that their financial and non-financial needs have been met. In addition to settlement services that the AWO provides to clients in Canada, the AWO also advocates for the rights of refugees and has been advocating for the human rights of Afghan women and girls.

The AWO is seeking students to conduct legal and policy research to write an advocacy/policy paper that can be used to provide evidence-based policy advice and educate stakeholders on the issue of women and girls’ rights in Afghanistan. Given the imminent humanitarian crisis in Afghanistan and the concern over mounting violence against women and girls, the AWO requires policy research to identify legal and political means to ensure the rights that Afghan women and girls have gained over the past twenty years are not eroded.

Students will prepare an advocacy/policy paper on what Canada and other international players can do to ensure twenty years of progress for women and girls' rights in Afghanistan are not lost. This will entail research on:

• Applicable international law and policies that relate to protecting women and girls’ rights
• Women and girls' rights in Afghanistan prior to the Taliban rule
• Women and girls’ rights (or lack thereof) under Taliban rule (1996-2001)
• Women and girls’ rights post-Taliban (i.e. gains made)
• Current situation of women and girls and major obstacles faced by women

The advocacy/policy paper will distill the research findings in plain language and provide concrete recommendations. The student will also help identify ways to best use this document as part of AWO’s advocacy efforts (e.g. increase public awareness, address inquiries from media, educate MPs/Ministers etc..).

AMI.ca – Rights of People Living with Disabilities Legal Research Human Rights 1 Legal Research & Writing N/A Yes Yes https://www.ami.ca/category/kelly-and-company AMI is a not-for-profit media company that entertains, informs and empowers Canadians who are blind or partially sighted. Operating three broadcast services, AMI-tv and AMI-audio in English and AMI-télé in French, AMI’s vision is to establish and support a voice for Canadians with disabilities, representing their interests, concerns and values through accessible media, reflection and portrayal. Kelly & Co. is a weekly 2-hour broadcast that reaches 3k-5k people each week, featuring interviews and discussions about arts, entertainment and lifestyle issues. The student volunteer will support production of the Kelly & Co. broadcast by conducting legal research and producing brief legal research memos. Once legal research memos are reviewed and approved by the supervising lawyer and organization contact, legal information contained within these memos will be disseminated publicly via the broadcasts. Information on the broadcast and topics can be found on the organization's website. Students will complete legal research in the areas outlined above. The project will engage a law student in research about current legal issues that pertain to people living with disabilities in Canada. Particular focus will be on new federal legislation, as well as that of Ontario.
Animal Justice: Legal Research Project Animal, Environment 3 Legal Research & Writing Upper Years Only Yes No https://www.animaljustice.ca Animal Justice uses the law to protect animals. They work to strengthen legal protections for animals across Canada and go to court to enforce laws governing the treatment of animals and the rights of animal advocates. Animal Justice also works to educate the public regarding the treatment of animals used for human food, entertainment, fashion, and scientific research. Animal Justice is seeking students to conduct legal research in various areas of animal protection law, constitutional law, and human rights law in support of Animal Justice's litigation files as well as its law reform campaigns. Students will focus on the following three overarching topics:

(1) Agricultural gag ("ag gag") laws - Various jurisdictions across Canada (prominently including Alberta, Ontario, and Mantioba) have introduced or passed laws designed to stop employee whistleblowers and investigative journalists from publicly exposing animal abuse on farms and/or to restrict protest by animal advocates on public property near transport trucks. Animal Justice is in the midst of challenging the constitutionality of Ontario's ag gag law (The Security from Trespass and Protecting Food Safety Act, 2020, S.O. 2020, c.9) and may engage in challenges in one or more other jurisdictions. Animal Justice is actively working to stop the spread of ag gag laws provincially and federally;

(2) Research on prospective litigation - Students may also be asked to conduct research as part of Animal Justice's other ongoing and planned legal challenges. These involve, among other things, protecting the free expression rights of animal advocates, rights to be free from discrimination on the basis of creed for individuals with secular belief systems (i.e. ethical veganism), and public interest standing in animal law;

(3)Assistance on law reform - Animal Justice is involved in several law reform initiatives at the federal, provincial, and municipal level. These include the development of regulations under Ontario's Provincial Animal Welfare Services Act, 2019, S.O. 2019, c.13, efforts to enact bans on fur farming federally and in several provinces, promoting the development of alternatives to animal testing under Bill C-28 (the Strengthening Environmental Protection for a Healthier Canada Act), and efforts to ban the use of pesticides to kill predators such as wolves, coyotes, and bears.

Students will conduct legal research and draft a memo containing their results.
Barbra Schlifer Commemorative Clinic: Public Legal Education and Family Court Support Program Family, Womens 1 Public Legal Education, Client Intake and Assistance N/A Mixed Model. For the PLE project, work will be done remotely. For the Family Court Support Program, student placements will occur at Toronto courthouses, subject to public health policy and university/faculty directives. Yes https://schliferclinic.com/ The Barbra Schlifer Commemorative Clinic offers legal services and representation, trauma-informed counselling and multilingual interpretation to diverse women (self-identified), non-binary, intersex, and Two-Spirit people who have experienced violence. We cultivate skills and resilience by fostering safety, dignity and equality and we amplify voices to create individual and collective change. Together with our donors and volunteers, we are active in changing the conditions that create environments of violence and oppression. The Clinic’s Legal Department provides services in family and immigration law, and independent legal advice to survivors of sexual assault. The Clinic’s partnership with PBSC for 2021-2022 will be divided by semester to accommodate health and safety protocols around COVID-19. Students will be placed with the Clinic’s Legal Department. Semester 1 students will work remotely. Depending on safety protocols and instructions from each student’s respective law faculty, the Barbra Schlifer Clinic, and the local family courts, students will complete their placement for semester 2 within the Family Court Support Program at the court locations. In-person activities will only be permitted if public health policy and university/faculty directives allow. If this is not feasible, students will continue their placement on PLE projects. Students will be informed before semester 2 where they will complete their placements. Students will be required to remotely attend a mandatory training session before their placement commences.

Project information for semester 1:
The Clinic’s clients can benefit from legal information materials to help them understand their legal issues and to work with Clinic staff, including lawyers, Family Court Support Workers, legal intake, counselling and other support services. The students will be introduced to issues related to gender-based violence, public legal education and plain language skills, and work with staff to develop PLE materials for public posting and distribution. All work will be done remotely. Some opportunities for shadowing client meetings may also be possible.

Project information for semester 2:
The Family Court Support Program is funded by the Ministry of the Attorney General. Ordinarily, staff are Court-based and meet with clients to provide legal information, referrals, safety planning and support at the three Toronto family courts (311 Jarvis, 361 University, 47 Sheppard). The Clinic administers the English-language court support program in Toronto and makes referrals to the French language Court Support Program (OASIS). The Family Court Support Workers work with duty counsel, Legal Aid Ontario, shelters, Victim/Witness Assistance Workers, and court staff and other external service providers. Court accompaniment is also sometimes provided. PBSC students will assist the BSCC Court Support Workers, including during intakes, assessments, and safety planning. Students will complete other tasks under the direct supervision and guidance of the BSCC Court Support Workers, including:

-Supporting with client intakes;
-Assisting with follow-up calls to clients;
-Supporting Family Court Support Workers with writing up and organizing client notes;
-Researching referrals to specialized services and community supports; and,
-Supporting Family Court Support Workers with client court accompaniments, including, where appropriate, meetings with lawyers.

Students will not provide legal advice or assistance with pleadings but will be exposed to the court system and where appropriate provide court accompaniment which typically involves the opportunity to sit in on legal proceedings and take notes.

Students will be asked their availability for attending weekly shifts at one of the 3 Toronto courthouses at the beginning of the second semester of the Project, in accordance with safety protocols and the methods used for conducing court proceedings.

Students will conduct research and produce materials for Public Legal Education and potentially assist with Family Court Support work.
Battista Smith Migration Law Group – LGBTQ+ Immigration and Refugee Project Queer, Immigration & Refugee 2 Legal Research & Writing,Client Intake and Assistance Upper Years Only Yes No https://www.migrationlawgroup.com/ The Toronto immigration lawyers that make up Battista Smith believe that migration is a fundamental part of human freedom and that migration barriers should exist only when they are necessary. They understand that diverse communities are the groups most often concerned about international mobility, and provide practical, experienced legal advice that will assist in making informed decisions to support their clients’ immigration goals. The immigration landscape in Canada has become increasingly complex and urgent. Most often, diverse communities are the groups that are the most concerned about international mobility. In particular, Battista Smith Migration Law Group champions immigration issues for the LGBTQ+
and HIV communities.This project involves assisting Battista Smith with their pro bono and/or legal aid-funded cases pertaining to LGBTQ+ refugee claims and court applications. The project involves largely legal research and client intake.In addition to casework, this project involves producing blog posts for the Battista Smith Migration Law Group website. These posts will cover a range of issues but will mostly pertain to plain-language information on recent changes to immigration and refugee law.
Students will conduct legal research and create blog content. Students will research human rights reports from particular countries around the world and analyze a case’s relevant documentation to create their “theory of a case.” The student’s research and analysis will be submitted to the lawyer supervisor for review, effectively and prominently contributing to the progression of these LGBTQ+ refugee claim cases. Students may also assist with drafting documents for Federal Court applications.
Butterfly (Asian and Migrant Sex Workers Support Network) – Immigration and Refugee Public Legal Education Immigration & Refugee, Womens 1 Public Legal Education N/A Yes No https://www.butterflysw.org/ Butterfly was formed by sex workers, social workers, legal and health professionals. It provides support to, and advocates for, the rights of Asian and migrant sex workers. The organization is founded upon the belief that sex workers are entitled to respect and basic human rights. Butterfly asserts that, regardless of their immigration status, Asian and migrant sex workers should be treated like all other workers. Butterfly is working in partnership with the Chinese Canadian National Council for Social Justice (CCNC) to create a public legal education series on the immigration and refugee application process for precariously employed individuals – this includes but is not limited to sex workers. In particular, the project will focus on creating tools to answer questions related to immigration and refugee applications on humanitarian and compassionate grounds, and specific questions collected from precarious workers during community consultation on the application process.

The goal of this project is to empower the Chinese and Chinese-Canadian communities and prevent precariously employed immigrants from exploitation (i.e. the promise of immigration for monetary compensation).

The student will conduct a literature review on the immigration and refugee process for precariously employed individuals from China. In particular, the research will focus on making an application on humanitarian and compassionate grounds. The student will also reach out to immigration and refugee organizations and experts in the field to understand the unwritten complexities of the process to inform their literature review. Students will first conduct a general overview of the process and then will be provided more specific questions to research which will come from the community consultation conducted by Butterfly and CCNC.

The student's research will be reviewed, and they will assist the supervisor in creating an accessible, plain language and informative brochure, social media post, and/or workshop/presentation. If the opportunity arises, they will also conduct supervised legal information sessions for Butterfly and CCNC.

Butterfly (Asian and Migrant Sex Workers Support Network) – Toronto Bylaws on Body-Rub Parlours Research Project Human Rights 1 Legal Research & Writing Upper Years Only Yes Yes https://www.butterflysw.org/ Butterfly was formed by sex workers, social workers, legal and health professionals. It provides support to, and advocates for, the rights of Asian and migrant sex workers. The organization is founded upon the belief that sex workers are entitled to respect and basic human rights. Butterfly asserts that, regardless of their immigration status, Asian and migrant sex workers should be treated like all other workers. Body rub parlours are any place where non-medical or non-therapeutic massaging services are provided by someone other than registered massage therapists, or other licensed or registered holistic practitioners. Those who own or operate body rub parlours are required to have a Body Rub Parlour licence. The City of Toronto is currently in the process of reviewing its bylaws on body-rub parlours, as such Butterfly and the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network are looking to draft a submission with recommendations to the City.

Butterfly and the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network are seeking a student to conduct legal research on body-rub parlour bylaws and policies in Toronto and other cities across Canada (i.e. Hamilton, Montreal, Ottawa), compare how body-rub parlours are regulated in these different jurisdictions, and produce a memo on their findings. The organizations are also looking to understand whether these bylaws are valid, compliant with human rights legislation, or if they endanger the lives of parlour workers. This memo will be used by both organizations to make appropriate recommendations to the City of Toronto in their submission.

The student will complete legal research and help expand past development on this project. The student will help to draft a submission to the city of Toronto on the bylaw review and help write a policy paper related to best practice bylaws for body rub parlours. All submissions and research memos will be reviewed by the supervising lawyer before being provided to Butterfly. Students will have the opportunity to attend online meetings and participate in the organizations’ consultation meetings that directly address this issue.
Canadian Centre to End Human Trafficking – Human Trafficking Charge Research Project Criminal 1 Legal Research & Writing Upper Years Only, Pre-reqs include Criminal Law and Legal Research and Writing Yes Yes www.canadiancentretoendhumantrafficking.ca The Canadian Centre to End Human Trafficking (“CCTEHT”) is a national charity dedicated to ending all types of human trafficking in Canada. Their mission is to end human trafficking for the purpose of sexual and labour exploitation in Canada by providing strength and support to stakeholders through collective action, by creating opportunities to connect and learn from each other and by building capacity, on all levels, to end this abhorrent crime in Canada. The Centre has been established as the national “backbone” organization working on this issue. They collaborate and work with the various stakeholders dedicated to this issue, including all levels of government, private sector businesses and frontline service providers to advance best practices and eliminate duplicate efforts across Canada Human Trafficking is defined as recruiting, transporting, transferring, receiving, holding, concealing or harbouring a person, or exercising control direction or influence over the movements of a person, to exploit them or to assist in facilitating their exploitation (sections 279.01 and 279.011 of the Canadian Criminal Code). Victims suffer physical or emotional abuse and often live and work in horrific conditions. They may also face fatal consequences if they attempt to escape. This crime represents a consistent and pervasive assault on the fundamental human rights of its victims.

Due to limited data, Canadians are only starting to understand the extent to which trafficking occurs in this country. It is a sophisticated, organized crime that demands sophisticated, coordinated and integrated solutions. The Canadian Centre to End Human Trafficking (“CCTEHT”) is seeking student support to conduct case law research and produce a detailed memo that answers the following research questions:

• What precedents and evidentiary requirements have been established for human trafficking cases and convictions?
• Of the human trafficking cases that lead to a conviction, what were the defining features of a guilty charge?
• How does a human trafficking charge compare to other (similar) violent crimes such as sexual assault, domestic assault, human smuggling, sexual exploitation, child prostitution, child pornography, etc.?
• Additional related questions, as required.

This information will be used by the CCTEHT to build better internal knowledge about the nature and complexity of the human trafficking charge, and related charges, in Canada.

Students will conduct a review of relevant legislation and jurisprudence and draft a research memo summarizing the findings, including:

• A legislative and jurisprudential scan of the legal framework for human trafficking as applied to criminal courts both internationally and domestically will be done. This will involve a review of relevant jurisprudence, summarizing appropriate cases and providing an overarching analysis of jurisprudential trends.
• The students will also draft a research memo summarizing the findings to provide insight into both appropriate remedies and the consideration made by the courts in determining what is appropriate for a human trafficking conviction.
• The students will have the opportunity to present their findings to the CCTEHT senior leadership team and Board of Directors upon completion of the report.

Canadian Environmental Law Association (CELA) Research Project Animal, Environment 1 Legal Research & Writing Upper Year Only, Pre-reqs include Public Law (taken or currently enrolled) Yes No www.cela.ca CELA uses existing laws to protect the environment and, where necessary, advocates environmental law reforms. As an Ontario Legal Aid clinic, CELA provides legal representation to low-income individuals and disadvantaged communities facing environmental problems who cannot otherwise afford legal assistance. When implementing our legal aid mandate, CELA’s strategic objectives are to:
- Hold governments and polluters legally accountable in relation to environmental harm or adverse effects on public health and safety;
- Maintain and expand citizens’ environmental rights, and improve environmental equity;
- Seek preventative solutions where possible to reduce or avoid activities or exposures that may harm human or ecosystem health; and
- Ensure timely, effective cleanup of past or present pollution to achieve improvement in public health and environmental quality.
Student volunteers will produce research memos on current case files as required and will assist lawyers on law reform matters.

In general, students will be responsible for meeting deadlines, keeping open communication with their lawyer supervisor, and ensuring they are bringing any delays or concerns to the attention of the Lawyer Supervisor and/or Program Coordinator in a timely fashion.

Note on Potential Conflicts: If students are hired for summer employment during their time volunteering on this project, they are required to disclose their upcoming employment arrangements with CELA to avoid the creation of any conflicts between that place of employment and CELA. Student volunteers entering their second or third year in Fall 2021 should notify CELA of where they have worked in Summer 2021 to avoid research assignments that could create a conflict.

Canadian Civil Liberties Association (CCLA) RightsWatch Project Human Rights 1 Legal Research & Writing Upper Year Only Yes No www.ccla.org CCLA fights for the civil liberties, human rights, and democratic freedoms of all people across Canada. We are an independent, national, nongovernmental organization, working in the courts, before legislative committees, in classrooms and in the streets, protecting the rights and freedoms cherished by Canadians and entrenched in our Constitution. CCLA RightsWatch is a project to allow students the chance to monitor key civil liberties issues and cases before courts and legislatures, and to provide assistance to CCLA advocacy directors in keeping track, in a timely way, of the issues arising across the country. Students will be assigned a particular court or legislative assembly to monitor.

Most of the courts to be monitored will be appellate courts and for some provinces where the appellate court is less busy, students may be asked to monitor more than one appellate court at a time. For some of the busier appellate courts, it may be necessary to have two students doing the monitoring. Monitoring will consist of checking for new decisions on a weekly or biweekly basis and identifying those that may be of interest to CCLA and/or raise potential civil liberties or human rights issues. Where a case is identified as potentially of interest, students will complete a form to be submitted to CCLA which will provide a brief summary of the decision and identify the key issues that may be of interest to the CCLA.

Some students will monitor the legislative assembly of a province/territory and scan for new bills and/or new work by committees. Monitoring will take place on a weekly or biweekly basis. Students are expected to identify new legislation or committee work that gives rise to potential civil liberties or human rights concerns and flag those for CCLA’s attention. Once again, students will complete a form to be submitted to CCLA which will provide a brief summary of the legislation/committee work and identify the key issues that may be of interest to the CCLA.

CLASP & KPMG Tax Dispute Clinic Tax 4 Client Intake and Assistance, Public Legal Education Upper Year Only, Pre-reqs include successfully completing or concurrently taking an introductory tax law course. Yes Yes www.osgoode.yorku.ca/community-clinics/welcome-community-legal-aid-services-program-clasp CLASP is a free community legal clinic that assists low-income individuals in the City of Toronto with their legal issues in administrative law, criminal law, family law, and immigration law. KPMG is a Canadian leader in delivering Audit, Tax, and Advisory services. KPMG responds to clients’ complex business challenges across the country and around the world. Their employees provide crucial services to many of the top business, not for profit and government organizations in Canada. Why a Pro Bono Tax Clinic Model?
Many low-income individuals encounter legal problems in, or including, tax law. Despite this, pro bono services in tax law are extremely limited in Toronto and Canada more generally. This clinic is a collaboration between CLASP, KPMG Law LLP, and PBSC to meet the needs of the community and serve as a model for other tax clinics across the country. The resolution of a tax matter often enables the taxpayer to address other problems, such as obtaining better housing, purchasing or repairing a vehicle, or obtaining needed medical care with the tax refund or relief. The structure for the Pro Bono Tax Clinic is based on the process used in Virgina’s Community Tax Law Project, one of 156 Low-Income Tax Clinics across the United States. The structure has been modified to reflect the planning meeting held on July 25th, 2018.Scope of Services:
Services will be limited to summary advice and legal information. Assistance is available for the following tax issues:
• Disability tax credits/programs
• Spousal support
• Child tax benefits
• Small credits
• Housing creditsClinic Intake and Service:
Potential clients can reach the Tax Dispute Clinic at CLASP’s main number (416 736 5029) during CLASP’s operating hours. Students will have access to the CLASP-KPMG email account to access client information and will assist with intake when possible. At this time, there will be no in-person client work, therefore all work will be completed remotely. Supervision by the KPMG Lawyers will also be done remotely either through phone call or Zoom. Additional procedures, including measures such as how forms will be signed, will be outlined during training at the start of the placement.Where written advice is required, students will speak with the supervising lawyer to confirm next steps. No letters will be sent by students or by the clinic without the express approval and due diligence required of the supervising lawyer. Before and after each shift, and time permitting, lawyers and students will have a quick virtual debrief about recent clients and tax law issues.It is expected that a diverse range of other legal issues may arise while interviewing clients. Volunteer lawyers and PBSC students are encouraged to make the appropriate referrals using CLASP’s referral binder.Public Legal Education:
CLASP receives requests from the community for PLEs. CLASP can advise community partners that the Tax Dispute Clinic can provide Tax Law PLEs. The Tax Dispute Clinic students will work, under the supervision of the supervising lawyer, to develop PLE materials and deliver PLEs in the community, should the opportunity arise.
Students will conduct legal research and assist with client intake.
Community Legal Clinic of York Region Poverty, Housing, Employment 2 Client Intake and Assistance, Public Legal Education N/A Yes No https://clcyr.on.ca/ The Community Legal Clinic of York Region promotes access to justice and the elimination of poverty through legal representation, summary advice, referrals, public legal education and information, community development, and law reform. The Community Legal Clinic of York Region (“CLCYR”) is a not-for-profit organization serving low-income residents in York Region. CLCYR supports York residents with a variety of legal matters related to:
- Housing and Tenant’s Rights
- Social Assistance
- Criminal Injuries Compensation Board Claims
- Advice on Employment Law
- Advice on Immigration LawThe CLCYR project involves creating content for public legal education (PLE) in their core areas of law (i.e. Social Assistance Law, Housing, etc.) to support clinic clients. Research topics for PLE will be selected each week by students and research findings will be shared with the lawyer supervisor at the end of the week.In addition to conducting legal research for the public legal education materials, there are opportunities to support client intake by collecting medical evidence and/or supporting clients in filling out their legal forms (i.e. immigration documents). All completed legal forms will be reviewed and approved by the supervising lawyer prior to use by the client.
Students will be involved in legal research or creating content for public legal education. Students will conduct and produce research memos for case workers with a focus on Social Assistance Law but will also include other domains of law such as housing and immigration. At the start of each week students will meet online with their supervisor to discuss a research topic or question and will meet again at the end of the week to discuss the student’s findings.
Criminal Court Decisions Research Project with Professor Richard Haigh Criminal 2 Legal Research & Writing N/A Yes No https://www.osgoode.yorku.ca/faculty-and-staff/haigh-richard/ This project draws together legal experts, social scientists and others from the public policy sector to address issues of access to justice, human rights and social policy, accountability and ethics in the public sector and the globalization of public policy. As a collaborative interdisciplinary research centre their mandate is to engage in and support research that meets the needs of the broader community, in particular the needs of government and public policymakers, non-governmental organizations, citizen advocacy groups and social movements in Canada. This project draws together legal experts, social scientists and others from the public policy sector to address issues of access to justice, human rights and social policy, accountability and ethics in the public sector and the globalization of public policy. As a collaborative interdisciplinary research centre their mandate is to engage in and support research that meets the needs of the broader community, in particular the needs of government and public policymakers, non-governmental organizations, citizen advocacy groups and social movements in Canada.

This project examines judicial trends in criminal cases in the Ontario Court of Justice and the Ontario Superior Court. Students will be assigned a single judge and review all criminal decisions made by that judge, entering various data points related to each case and drafting memoranda on any potential trends that emerge. The students’ research will then be turned into a research paper or report drafted by the supervisor, who will draw conclusions from the students’ work.

Students will conduct research as a part of the ongoing project under the supervision of Professor Richard Haigh.
DUKE Heights BIA – Small Businesses and Start-up Public Legal Education Project Business 1 Public Legal Education Upper Year Only, Pre-reqs either corporate law or labour and employment law courses Yes No https://dukeheights.ca/ DUKE Heights BIA is an association of over 2500 businesses (property owners and business owners) located in the area between Dufferin, Keele, Steeles and Sheppard. The BIA is an arm’s length agency of the City of Toronto; its primary objective is to create a thriving, competitive and safe neighborhood, that enhances business sustainability and growth and attracts new businesses, shoppers, diners etc.

Our main mandate is:
• To improve the BIA through streetscape development capital improvements, maintenance and beautification
• To lead initiatives that provide business support to our local businesses
• To promote the business improvement area as a business, employment, tourist and shopping area
• To advocate on behalf of the interest of our business memebers

The name Duke Heights comes from the first two letters of Dufferin St. and Keele St., and its location, at the northernmost and highest part of the City of Toronto. The DUKE Heights Business Improvement Area, created in 2014, is Ontario’s second-largest BIA in terms of surface area, and is home to over 2,500 businesses, employing over 30,000 people and more than 120,000 visitors per weekday (numbers pre-Covid). Nestled between Downsview Park and York University, the area has great potential and is home to a wide mix of innovative businesses: large manufacturers, food producers, retail, restaurants, auto shops, sports arenas, medical facilities, offices and professional services, businesses that offer educational, recreational and vocational classes, entertainment and sports centers etc. With the TTC, GO transit, the future Finch West LRT and various highways surrounding the BIA, the community is greatly positioned for strategic and planned growth.

DUKE Heights BIA has partnered with Osgoode Hall Law school to support their free legal information project. This project is designed to improve access to legal information for small business owners, employers, employees, and future entrepreneurs operating in the BIA who need legal assistance but cannot necessarily afford a lawyer’s help. Through this initiative, Osgoode and DUKE Heights BIA foster improvements for members of the business community and help them overcome the hurdles of access to legal information that many new business owners often face.

Duke Heights BIA is looking for a student to conduct legal information on relevant corporate statutes as requested by the supervising lawyer to support the development of informative legal information brochures. These brochures will be disseminated via Duke Heights BIA email list.

The student will conduct legal information on relevant corporate statues as requested by the supervising lawyer to support the development of informative legal information brochures.
Durham Community Legal Clinic – Digitizing Poverty Law Public Legal Education Project Poverty, Housing, Employment 2 Public Legal Education N/A Yes Yes https://www.durhamcommunitylegalclinic.ca The Durham Community Legal Clinic mission is to promote the diverse needs of the community through social justice and equitable access in an integrative, innovative and client-centered manner. The clinics vision is a healthy and sustainable community where residents are empowered and engaged. The Durham Community Legal Clinic is a non-profit community legal clinic funded by Legal Aid Ontario. The clinic gives people living on a low income in Durham Region free legal services for certain problems.

The clinic is seeking a student to support their Digitizing Poverty Law project. The project seeks to aid individuals with poverty law issues beyond just that of legal assistance.

The project objectives are:
(1) Educate low-income and vulnerable clients on their legal rights regarding their legal issue, specific legal issues pertaining to:
o Employment and Work
o Debt and Consumer rights
o Tenant Rights
o Provincial Offences
o Small Claims Court
o Human rights
o Wills & Power of Attorney
o Commission of Documents
(2) Creating accessible digital public legal education (PLE) tools to provide legal information and advice to low income and vulnerable clients
(3) Encouraging alternative dispute resolution as a means of avoiding costly litigation

The clinic will take a coordinated approach to the development and delivery of legal information and public legal education about poverty law issues.

Students will conduct legal research on specific poverty law issues and produce detailed memos for internal use and plain language infographics and for public use. Students will also develop Public Legal Education (PLE) materials such as videos on specific poverty law issues to be posted on the clinics website and/or used as a part of PLE sessions.
Durham Community Legal Clinic- Family Law Triage Family 2 Client Intake and Assistance, Public Legal Education N/A Yes Yes https://www.durhamcommunitylegalclinic.ca The Durham Community Legal Clinic mission is to promote the diverse needs of the community through social justice and equitable access in an integrative, innovative and client-centered manner. The clinics vision is a healthy and sustainable community where residents are empowered and engaged. The Durham Community Legal Clinic are a non-profit community legal clinic funded by Legal Aid Ontario. The clinic gives people living on a low income in Durham Region free legal services for certain problems.

The clinic is seeking a student to support their Family Law Triage/Hub project. The project seeks to provide assistance to individuals with family law issues beyond just that of legal assistance.

The project objectives are:
• Diverting victims of domestic violence to appropriate service providers;
• Encouraging alternative dispute resolution as a means of avoiding costly litigation;
• Assist with financial planning and finding appropriate mental health supports.

The clinic will take a coordinated approach to the development and delivery of legal information
and public legal education about family law issues.

Students will conduct legal research on specific family law issues and produce detailed memos for internal use and plain language infographics for public use. Students will also develop Public Legal Education (PLE) materials on specific family law issues, and engage in outreach efforts including delivering virtual PLE sessions. Additionally, Students will have the opportunity to participate in family law triage planning meetings, and take part in the client intake and screening process via phone.
Durham Community Legal Clinic – The Sexual Harassment in the Workplace Project Employment 2 Public Legal Education N/A Yes Yes https://www.durhamcommunitylegalclinic.ca The Durham Community Legal Clinic mission is to promote the diverse needs of the community through social justice and equitable access in an integrative, innovative and client-centered manner. The clinics vision is a healthy and sustainable community where residents are empowered and engaged. The Durham Community Legal Clinic are a non-profit community legal clinic funded by Legal Aid Ontario. The clinic gives people living on a low income in Durham Region free legal services for certain problems.

The clinic is seeking a student to support their Sexual Harassment in the Workplace Project. The project is funded by the Department of Justice Canada under a program designed to increase public awareness and knowledge around sexual harassment in the workplace, and provide access to legal information and advice for persons who have experienced sexual harassment in the workplace. This is a five-year funded project targeting young workers, newcomers, other vulnerable employees and low-income workers.

The project objectives are:
• educate low-income and vulnerable clients on their legal rights in regards to sexual harassment in the workplace;
• provide legal information and advice to low income and vulnerable clients on sexual harassment in the workplace, including information and advice on human rights and other employment rights;
• coordinate responses and materials and resources across legal clinics in Eastern Ontario around the issue of sexual harassment in the workplace.

The clinic will take a coordinated approach to the development and delivery of legal information and advice and public legal education on sexual harassment in the workplace

Students will conduct legal research on specific sexual harassment in the workplace issues and produce detailed memos for internal use and plain language infographics for public use. Specifically, students will also develop Public Legal Education (PLE) materials on specific workplace harassment issues, and engage in outreach efforts including delivering virtual PLE sessions and producing written content for local publications and for Durham’s dedicated project website.

Students will also produce research memos for Human Rights and Workers Compensation files related to Sexual Harassment in the workplace, and have the opportunity to take part in the client intake and screening process by phone.

FASD and the Justice System – Research and Outreach Project Criminal 3 Legal Research & Writing, Public Legal Education N/A Yes Yes https://fasdjustice.ca/en-ca/ FASD and the Justice System provides information and resources about Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), including background information, case law, legal resources and strategies for effective intervention. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is an umbrella term for the leading causes of mental and developmental disabilities in the Western world. A person with FASD always has permanent brain damage, though obvious physical effects are usually absent. The result is that FASD is often invisible to the untrained eye.

FASD presents many difficult challenges across the judicial system, from arrest through to corrections and parole processes. The objective of the website is to provide information for lawyers, judges, youth and community workers, police, and correctional services staff to help them better address these challenges and improve justice system outcomes for people with FASD. Students support FASD and the Justice System will be working on projects such as:
- Conducting regular searches for case law related to FASD (i.e. criminal law, child welfare, Indigenous issues, etc.)
- Conducting research to find new reports on FASD and the justice system and resources for those with FASD
- Conducting research on topics as identified by the steering committee

The student will also help with social media outreach (Twitter and Facebook) and outreach to law faculty and law students to support FASD and the Justice System.

Students will complete a research memo on the above topics and will help maintain content for the website.
FCJ Refugee Centre: Uprooted People Protection Program Immigration & Refugee 6 Legal Research & Writing,Client Intake and Assistance N/A Yes No https://www.fcjrefugeecentre.org/ The FCJ Refugee Centre has a mandate to assist refugees and other uprooted people in re-establishing their lives and integrating into Canadian society. With an open-door approach, the Centre offers an integrated model of refugee protection, settlement services and education, including shelter for women and their children. The Uprooted People Protection Program provides legal information for refugee claimants and non-status people, including conducting research on country conditions and other immigration and refugee issues, assistance with filling out legal forms and conducting in-person sessions for people looking for legal information. Students in the upcoming year will focus their work on assisting clients with completing their Humanitarian and Compassionate Considerations applications. Another unique aspect of this program is providing legal information specific to people who have been denied their refugee claims but are unable to return to their own country. Students will meet directly with clients to help them complete their Basis of Claim forms, under the supervision of the clinic’s staff lawyers. Student volunteers are not permitted to offer legal advice. Any questions of a legal nature will be referred to the clinic’s staff lawyers for follow-up. Students will complete legal research on the topics of refugee and immigration law and to assist
clients.
FAIR Canada – Investor Protection Public Legal Education and Research Project Business, Securities 2 Legal Research & Writing, Public Legal Education N/A Yes. Student volunteers are required to work remotely until such time as public health policy and university/law faculty directives permit the resumption of in-person activities. Yes www.faircanada.ca FAIR Canada is to be a catalyst for enhancing the rights of Canadian shareholders and individual investors including being a national voice for investors in securities regulation. FAIR Canada’s goal is to broaden public awareness of its work through use of plain language communications and participation in investor advocacy community and media engagement activities. FAIR Canada has identified access to justice for investors as a current strategic focus. This includes compensation through enforcement proceedings, binding authority for OBSI compensation awards, and investor protection legal aid clinics at Canadian universities. The Canadian Foundation for the Advancement of Investor Rights (FAIR Canada) is an independent national charitable organization. As a voice for Canadian investors, FAIR Canada provides information and education to the public, governments and regulators about investors’ rights and protections in Canada’s capital markets.

Millions of people in Ontario invest their savings in hopes of a promising reward however, many also suffer an investment loss. Those that suffer a loss often cannot afford a lawyer and are left without resources to help inform their next steps. One of FAIR Canada’s goals is to fill this gap by increasing access to legal information related to Securities Law and by advocating for enhanced investor protection in Canada.

FAIR Canada is seeking a student to conduct research and produce a detailed memo which will support a larger research project aimed at understanding complaint handling and compensation law in Canada relating to Securities Law. This information would then be transformed into blog posts for FAIR Canada’s online platforms in collaboration with staff-lawyers. These blog posts will be used as a part of Fair Canada’s to increase access to justice for investors by providing access to free legal information and to advocate for enhanced investor protection in Canada.

Students will conduct extensive legal research and provide a comparative analysis of existing complaints handling/compensation laws in Canada and international jurisdictions. The students will create a memo for staff at FAIR Canada with an analysis of compensation and complaint handlining laws that exist in Canada and internationally. This information will be used to advocate for investor protection in Canada.
Federation of Asian Canadian Lawyers (FACL) Community Outreach Program Family 3 Public Legal Education N/A Yes No http://on.facl.ca/ FACL is a diverse coalition of Asian Canadian legal professionals who promote equity, justice, and opportunity for Asian Canadian legal professionals and the broader community. FACL fosters advocacy, community involvement, legal scholarship and professional development. The Federation of Asian Canadian Lawyers (FACL) has developed a remote community outreach program to identify and address knowledge gaps related to various legal fields for Asian community members. The aim of the program is to partner with community organizations to create and provide public legal education in the form of presentations, workshops, webinars, recorded videos, social media/blog posts and plain language resources. Students will have the opportunity to work on developing a Family Law power-point presentation and accompanying pamphlets for community members to take away in various topics, including family law. All legal research and public legal education tools created will be reviewed by a qualified review counsel prior to dissemination to community members and partner organizations. Students will also assist in developing strategies that will assist in the provision of public legal education materials to community members.

Additionally, students will perform community outreach to communicate with organizations in the GTA to develop new projects. Students will learn about the needs of the community and develop presentations to present to individuals in that community. Students will also be supporting FACL in research related to achieving accreditation as a charitable organization.

Students will also be exploring the following questions throughout their placement:
(1) What gaps do you think are present for Asian communities in accessing legal services?
(2) How can we harness technology to address access to justice barriers in Asian communities

Students will conduct legal research on assigned areas of law, create public legal education tools (i.e. videos, presentations, pamphlets, etc.), conduct outreach and brainstorm new innovative ways of reaching Asian communities.
Family Transition Place (FTP) – Student Court Document Support Worker Family 1 Client Intake and Assistance N/A Yes No https://familytransitionplace.ca/ Family Transition Place (FTP) primarily provides services to women and children who have experienced abuse. FTP knows that abuse has wide-ranging impact on peoples’ lives in the community and society in general, so they aspire to: A community free of abuse where all individuals are treated with compassion, equity and respect, and live their lives in healthy relationships. Their mission is to support the holistic wellbeing of those affected by gender-based violence and promote healthy relationships and community, through education. The Family Transition Place (FTP) is a shelter that provides a safe and comfortable place to stay for women (16 years of age and older) and their children. FTP provides food and other essentials. They offer assistance with transportation and childcare, advocacy and accompaniment to appointments and court, individual and group counselling, and follow up support after your stay.

FTP will often receive requests from clients at their shelters to draft the following forms for family court:
• Form 8 – General Application
• Form 35.1 – Affidavit in Support of Claim for Custody or Access
• Form 5 – Application to Transfer the Family Law Value

FTP is looking for a student to support the drafting of such documents for women in crisis.

Students will have the opportunity to interview clients and draft legal documents under the supervisor of lawyer. Students will receive an internal email provided by FTP to communicate with all clients and access to a database to store all legal documents. Students may also have the opportunity to create some public legal education tools in Family Law to be used by the partner organization.
Innocence Canada: Wrongful Conviction High School Outreach Criminal 2 Public Legal Education N/A Yes No innocencecanada.com Innocence Canada is a Canadian, non-profit organization dedicated to identifying, advocating
for, and exonerating individuals convicted of a crime that they did not commit. In addition, we
work to prevent future injustices through legal education and reform
Awareness of wrongful convictions is increasing in Canada and with that the demand for education, especially among youth and high school teachers. This project aims to provide basic information on Innocence Canada, some main causes of wrongful convictions, and the stories of wrongly convicted Canadians through an interactive and informative presentation aimed at students from grades 10-12.

Prior to delivering the presentation, volunteers are to determine what organizations to refer students to if they want more info about their rights when interacting with police as it is imperative that students do not provide legal advice or information on this topic.

Students will need to reach out to high schools in their assigned area and ask if there is an interest to present on this topic. Schools will receive the contact information of high schools and teachers who participated in 2020-2021. Volunteers may need to reach out for contacts with the guidance of Innocence Canada. Students should consider reaching out to teachers and principals to begin the conversation. Relevant classes and subject matter include law, social studies, history.

Students will then schedule a time to present to the class – this is to be done virtually unless restrictions due to covid-19 allow for in-person attendance. The presentation generally lasts 45 minutes. Students should block off one hour for the presentation and be prepared to discuss other cases or issues in wrongful convictions if questions arise or there is a surplus of time. Of particular interest to students are Mr. Big investigations and the cases of Glen Assoun, Steven Truscott, Bill Mullins-Johnson, Maria Shepherd, and David Milgaard

Justice for Children and Youth Clinic and Legal Research Project Criminal 1 Client Intake and Assistance, Law Reform Upper Year Only Yes No http://jfcy.org/en/ Justice for Children and Youth strives to protect and advance the legal rights and dignity of children and youth. Justice for Children and Youth provides legal advice, representation and assistance to young people under the age of eighteen and unstably housed adults up until the age of 25. Students will work remotely with their assigned lawyer supervisor to assist them with their caseload. Typical tasks include with legal research, client follow up and letter writing.

Although each student may get the opportunity to sit in on an intake meeting between a client and their supervisor, students will predominately be engaged in research-based work on a broad range of topics. Examples of potential research topics may include child welfare, human rights claims, privacy matters, immigration matters, or administrative law matters.

All students are closely supervised and are given regular feedback on task performance. Each student will submit their research directly to their supervisor.

Pursuant to organizational and institutional regulations, students may be able to volunteer in the clinic during the winter term.

Students will complete legal research and assist with client intake under the supervision of a lawyer.
Law Society of Ontario (LSO) Internship Project - Intake and Resolution Civil Litigation, Adminstrative 1 Internship Upper Year Only Yes Yes https://lso.ca/ The Law Society of Ontario governs Ontario’s lawyers and paralegals in the public interest by ensuring that the people of Ontario are served by lawyers and paralegals who meet high standards of learning, competence, and professional conduct. The Law Society of Ontario (LSO) is seeking a student to assist with the following:

a) Gathering, and organizing resources previously gathered, on different law practice or legal topics to be provided to lawyers and paralegals as part of the Law Society’s remedial response to a complaint. Resources might include CPD programs, practice guidelines, accounting or bookkeeping guidelines, articles, tips and tricks, precedents or other written materials. Organization might include providing input on and assisting with the design and implementation of a remedial resource database.

b) Researching administrative law cases re procedural fairness as it applies to intake or early resolution processes.

Students will act as an independent researcher/resource gatherer for the LSO.
Law Society of Ontario (LSO) Internship Project - Office of the Executive Director Civil Litigation, Adminstrative 1 Internship Upper Years Only Yes Yes https://lso.ca/ The Law Society of Ontario governs Ontario’s lawyers and paralegals in the public interest by ensuring that the people of Ontario are served by lawyers and paralegals who meet high standards of learning, competence, and professional conduct. The Office of the Executive Director (OED) coordinates, oversees, and supports the functions of the Professional Regulation Division. This division is responsible for responding to complaints against licensees, including the resolution, investigation and prosecution of complaints which are within the jurisdiction provided under the Law Society Act.

In addition, the Professional Regulation Division provides trusteeship services in limited circumstances and it includes the Compensation Fund which compensates clients for certain losses suffered as a result of the dishonesty of a licensee.

The Law Society of Ontario (LSO) is seeking a student to work on a primary research project (described below), but may be asked to assist with individual tasks relating to ongoing complaints or litigation matters as needed.

The primary project will be to develop a research document that summarizes cases involving capacity, disability and/or accommodations. The project will include:
• Conducting case law review,
• Conducting research on case-specific issues as needed, and
• May involve case analysis, document review, or case summary.

This information will be used internally by the OED to support the Professional Regulation Division in responding to complaints against licensees.

Students will conduct legal research. All produced work will be reviewed and approval by the supervising lawyer.
Law Society of Ontario (LSO) Internship Project - Trustee Services Civil Litigation, Adminstrative 1 Internship Upper Years Only Yes No https://lso.ca/ The Law Society of Ontario governs Ontario’s lawyers and paralegals in the public interest by ensuring that the people of Ontario are served by lawyers and paralegals who meet high standards of learning, competence, and professional conduct. The Trustee Services Department (TSD) assumes the practices of licensees that have died, left practice, been revoked, etc. It is a very busy litigation department located at 393 University Ave.

The Law Society of Ontario (LSO) is seeking a student to assist with research, file review and drafting court materials for the TSD as requested. Students will be trained on a remote platform to allow them to complete their work from home.

Students will conduct legal research, assist with file reviews, and draft court materials. All produced work will be reviewed and approval by the supervising lawyer.
Law Society of Ontario (LSO) Internship Project – Litigation Services (Bilingual) Civil Litigation, Adminstrative 1 Internship Upper Years Only, Fluent in French Yes Yes https://lso.ca/ The Law Society of Ontario governs Ontario’s lawyers and paralegals in the public interest by ensuring that the people of Ontario are served by lawyers and paralegals who meet high standards of learning, competence, and professional conduct. The Law Society of Ontario (LSO) is seeking a student to assist with the following:

a) Assist with the development of a Bilingual Caselaw Compendium. The project will involve collecting decisions and key passages from decisions in French, and decisions and key passages in both official languages. The materials will then be organized into a compendium useful for the entire Professional Regulation Division. Finally, the student will identify key English decisions or passages to be translated (and assisting with the same if possible].

b) Updating the penalty tables used by Litigation Services.

c) Assist with individual tasks associated with the litigation process from time to time as the need arises.

The student will be an independent researcher/resource gatherer.
Law Students’ Society of Ontario (LSSO) Research and Advocacy Project Adminstrative 3 Legal Research & Writing, Public Legal Education, Client Advocacy N/A Yes No https://www.lsso.ca/ The Law Students’ Society of Ontario (LSSO) represents Ontario undergraduate law school students (i.e. those pursuing a J.D. or equivalent degrees). The LSSO’s general objectives include:
• Building relationships with governmental and regulatory stakeholders;
• Establishing a dialogue with law school administrators;
• Sharing best practices among law school student governments;
• Providing opportunities for law students to communicate and share their experiences and struggles at law school;
• Advocating for policies that reduce financial and non-financial barriers to accessing and completing legal education; and
• Promoting representativeness and diversity in law school classrooms and the legal profession.
The Law Students’ Society of Ontario is an advocacy body representing undergraduate (JD) law students at Ontario law schools. Their goal is to articulate student needs and concerns to the organizations that govern the legal profession, the universities that administer legal education, and government bodies that regulate post-secondary education and financial aid.

The LSSO is seeking a student to conduct legal research for upcoming projects focusing on access to justice, such as:
• The impact of the Law Society of Ontario’s (LSO) licensing scheme in comparison with other provincial law society on equity-seeking groups.
• Accessibility and financial transparency of legal education in Canada, through assistance related to the publication of the LSSO’s upcoming National Tuition Study. Students will be researching into how provincial governments across Canada are funding law schools and the implications such funding has on law school tuition to produce a comparative analysis. Students will also look at the difference in tuition on equity-seeking groups across Canada and the impact on students’ long-term financial stability with considerations of financial literacy and how this can impact access to justice efforts in the profession.
• Regulatory, procedural, and licencing requirements involved in the transition from law school to practice - in Ontario and other Canadian provinces. Students will be tasked with identifying and comparing the licencing requirements and regulations set out by the LSO for licencing applicants in Ontario and other jurisdictions.
• Other research as it arises out of the projects discussed above.

There will be opportunities for indirect advocacy and policy drafting for submission to the government during the winter semester.

Students will conduct legal and policy research, analyze and compare data, contribute to the writing and publication of LSSO advocacy materials.
Olthuis Kleer Townshend LLP (OKT) - United Nations Declaration on the Right of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) Domestic Case Law Project Human Rights, Indegenious 2 Legal Research & Writing Upper Years Only Yes No https://www.oktlaw.com/ OKT’s central philosophy is that there will be no real justice until Indigenous peoples have control over their own fates and future, including their land and economic and political decision-making. OKT supports use Canadian law as a means to achieve this goal and have extensive experience working for Indigenous communities and are deeply committed to justice to achieve success-however you define it. OKT works for Indigenous communities to help them get the most of out the Canadian legal system by formulating legal strategies in conjunction with the client, with Indigenous self-determination as the foundation.

OKT LLP is seeking two students to conduct research on domestic/Canadian caselaw with respect to the United Nations Declaration on the Right of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP), with the ultimate goal of creating an annotated version of UNDRIP to be published upon approval by the supervising lawyer and partnering organization.

Working alongside the OKT LLP – International Law project, students on this project will research and draft memoranda on caselaw related to UNDRIP. The students will complete the case review and continue to search for cases that reference UNDRIP with a focus on French cases.
Olthuis Kleer Townshend LLP (OKT) - United Nations Declaration on the Right of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) International Case Law Project Human Rights, Indegenious 2 Legal Research & Writing Upper Years Only Yes No https://www.oktlaw.com/ OKT’s central philosophy is that there will be no real justice until Indigenous peoples have control over their own fates and future, including their land and economic and political decision-making. OKT supports use Canadian law as a means to achieve this goal and have extensive experience working for Indigenous communities and are deeply committed to justice to achieve success-however you define it. OKT works for Indigenous communities to help them get the most of out the Canadian legal system by formulating legal strategies in conjunction with the client, with Indigenous self-determination as the foundation.

OKT LLP is seeking two students to conduct research on international caselaw with respect to the United Nations Declaration on the Right of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP), with the ultimate goal of creating an annotated version of UNDRIP to be published upon approval by the supervising lawyer and partnering organization.

Working alongside the OKT LLP – Domestic Law project, students on this project will research and draft memoranda on caselaw related to UNDRIP. The students will complete the case review and continue to search for cases that reference UNDRIP with a focus on French cases.
PBSC-Osgoode Podcast Project All areas 8 Public Legal Education N/A Yes Yes http://pbsc.osgoode.yorku.ca/ PBSC’s mandate is threefold:
(1) To train future lawyers by providing practical, supervised learning experiences for students;
(2) To increase access to justice for low-income individuals and non-profit organizations; and
(3) To promote a culture of pro bono in the profession.
The Pro Bono Podcast Project is a podcast, prepared and presented by law students. Podcasts will last approximately 30 minutes and will discuss important legal issues or occasionally interesting and off-centre legal topics, which relate to one of the existing PBSC projects, to stimulate interest and provide information.

The Podcast Project Lead will oversee the project, student volunteers, and will be the first point of contact for the volunteers. At the start of the placement, the Podcast Project Lead will establish a work schedule between students and the Lawyer Supervisor and will coordinate a mandatory training session for all volunteers.

The Podcast Project Lead will also be responsible for overseeing the recording, editing, and uploading of the podcast and will be responsible for the podcast equipment.

Students will choose a topic/PBSC partner organization, contact guest speakers, determine the interview, agenda, develop interview questions, and conduct the interviews on-air. The podcast will inform the public by providing various perspectives on a topical legal issue in an accessible way, while highlighting the PBSC project and partner organization.

Students will also be responsible for advertising the podcast and the episodes. The students will post on social media about the podcast and the episodes to generate interest for their podcast before its release. Students will be responsible for editing the episode, drafting a description of the podcast and posting it on their website and on each school’s respective social media accounts. The podcast can also be aired on the school’s radio station if available.

The PBSC disclaimer regarding legal information vs legal advice must be read before every show and clearly stated on any Pro Bono Radio websites/online content.

Romero House – Client Intake and PLE Project Immigration & Refugee 2 Public Legal Education, Client Intake and Assistance N/A Yes No https://romerohouse.org/ Romero House works with refugee claimants: people who claim refugee status after arriving in Canada. It provides transitional housing, where refugee families live with us for the one year after their arrival, in which time they are accompanied in navigating the refugee determination process and establishing their lives in Canada. Romero House also has walk-in programs, which includes clothing boutiques, and assistance with: settlement assistance, accessing legal aid, finding lawyers, refugee claim process, accessing education, and accessing social assistance. Romero House works with refugee claimants, meaning people who claim refugee status after arriving in Canada. Romero House provides transitional housing, where refugee families live with them for one year after their arrival in Canada. During this time, Romero House supports them in navigating the refugee determination process and establishing their lives in Canada. Romero House also has walk-in programs, which includes clothing boutiques, and assistance with: settlement assistance, accessing legal aid, finding lawyers, refugee claim process, accessing education, and accessing social assistance.

This project provides opportunities to support refugee claimants through the refugee determination process, client intake, as well as opportunities to conduct legal research to create public legal education materials. In particular, this project will involve the following:
• Looking at and improving Romero House’s work permits and PR on guides
• Creating Know your Rights info sheets about different issues for refugees. I.e. housing rights, right to work, right to go to school, right to health care, rights related to removal.
• Working with Romero House’s communications coordinator to add to / improve the For Refugee section of their website
• Working on Work Permit or PR applications as necessary.

The students will have the opportunity to assist with navigating the refugee determination process and will also conduct legal research in order to support the creation of public legal education materials. The students will create legal information materials/resources that can be used to provide these clients with legal information before they meet with Romero House staff for the full intake. The research will be oriented around immigration and refugee law.

The students may also be asked to assist with client intake and helping clients fill out forms related to the refugee determination process. The students can work on preparing a workshop if a specific need arises for one and if time permits.

HanVoice – Human Rights Lab Project Human Rights 1 Legal Research & Writing, Public Legal Education N/A Yes Yes https://www.hanvoice.ca/ HanVoice is an innovative organization focused on advocating for a Canadian solution to resettle vulnerable North Koreans in transit. HanVoice has advocated for a number of law and policy changes in Canada’s refugee system to facilitate the ability of North Korean defectors to successfully claim refugee status in Canada. HanVoice aims to develop a new generation of Canadian leaders who are mobilized and trained to affect human rights change both locally and globally. The HanVoice Human Rights Lab is a one-day international human rights training hosted at post- secondary institutions across Canada, with an internship component for a selected group of training graduates. HanVoice expects to host 15 trainings at 15 universities reaching 1,500 students by 2022, and 30 trainings at 30 universities reaching 3,000 students by 2023.

HanVoice seeks to address a general lack of Canadian expertise on issues pertaining to the Korean Peninsula. Although several Canadian universities provide expertise on Korean social and cultural issues, there is a lack of Canadian competency on North Korea. As a middle power and defender of international human rights, Canada is in a unique position to play a bigger role on the Korean Peninsula. As HanVoice transitions into a broader think+do tank focused on the Korean Peninsula, the Human Rights Lab seeks to expand HanVoice’s role in promoting youth engagement in the international human rights space by using the Korean Peninsula as a case study. HanVoice aims to develop a new generation of Canadian leaders who are mobilized and trained to affect human rights change both locally and globally.

To this end, the Lab has three objectives:
(1) Develop Canadian students’ knowledge on international human rights issues;
(2) Build Canadian students’ Asia competence using the Korean Peninsula as a case study for the international human rights training; and
(3) Connect Canadian students with human rights projects and opportunities abroad.

The Lab’s case study on the Korean Peninsula will demonstrate how and why Canada should strengthen its role in the region. HanVoice is looking for students to conduct legal research on human rights challenges faced by those in the Korean Peninsula to create specific case studies for the HanVoice Human Rights Lab. This includes things like:
• History of the North Korean Human Rights Movement
• North Korea’s Responses to Human Rights Pressures
• Human Rights through North Korea’s Perspective
• International Human Rights Mechanisms
• Structure of the United Nations
• International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights

Students will review particular human rights issues in the Korean Peninsula and develop a case study to be used in the Human Rights Lab. This involves conducting a review of relevant secondary sources, legislation, jurisprudence, and policies in Canada, the United States of America and the Korean Peninsula related to human rights in the Korean Peninsula.

Students will be responsible for conducting research and supporting HanVoice team members with the development of 2 case studies (1 per semester). Students may also be involved in creating a memo comparing different legal systems (i.e. US and Korean) to highlight areas of similarities and differences.

Students may also be asked to assist with legal research for HanVoice that does not relate to the Human Rights Lab. This will be assigned at the discretion of the Executive Director of HanVoice.

Women’s Law Association of Ontario (WLAO) – Women’s Legal Issues Project Womens 1 Legal Research & Writing N/A Yes No https://wlao.on.ca/ The Women’s Law Association of Ontario is dedicated to empowering women in the legal profession by providing a collective voice and advocating for equality, diversity and change. Since 1919, WLAO has been providing leadership and support to advance the status of women in the legal profession. The Women’s Law Association of Ontario (WLAO) is dedicated to its mission of empowering women by providing a collective voice and advocating for equality, diversity, and change. They have been an active voice for women, and this placement is no different.

The WLAO is seeking a student to advance fulsome responses and state its position on current legal issues facing women (i.e. Statement of Principles, defunding of legal organizations). Some areas of research the students may be asked to engage in are:
• Review of Law Society reports and studies relating to equity issues
• Review of recent court decisions affecting equity-seeking groups
• Assessing the implications of legislative developments in the areas of accessibility and diversity and inclusion
• Developing recommendations for policies and practices for the promotion of equity and diversity in the legal profession
• Discrimination against women in the profession

The research will be drafted into research memos and presented to the Board every month. Using the research memo and input from the Board, letters and/or articles detailing the WLAO’s position on these legal issues will be drafted. The letters/articles will be used to communicate the WLAO’s official position to the public and the Law Society of Ontario.

An opportunity to attend Town Halls hosted by the organization may also be possible.

*Note: any in-person activities will only be permissible subject to public health policy and university/faculty directives.

The student will conduct legal research on a wide area of women’s issues. The WLAO Advocacy Committee will inform the student on which legal issues are most important to the organization at the time, at which point the student will conduct legal research to unpack the complexities of the issue. The research will be drafted into research memos and presented to the Board every month. Using the research memo and input from the Board, the student will draft letters detailing the WLAO’s position on these legal issues. Upon review from the lawyer supervisor, the Committee, and other appropriate parties, the letters will be used to communicate the WLAO’s official position to the public and the Law Society of Ontario.

In addition, the student may have the opportunity to attend Town Halls hosted by the organization. If so, the student will be responsible for informally interviewing some of the participants of the Town Hall to gather information on which legal issues are the most important to them, so that the WLAO can make the decision to establish a formal position on such issues and provide advocacy and support where it can.

Indus Human Trafficking and International Students Legal Research Project Criminal 2 Legal Research & Writing N/A Yes No https://www.induscs.ca/ Indus Community Services (Indus) is an accredited, not-for-profit community benefit organization that has served local communities for 35 years. Indus is a community benefit organization focused on building resilient and healthy communities by offering person-centered, anti-oppressive programs and services The agency is a registered charity supported by its donors and by all three levels of government. Indus Community Services (Indus) is non-political and non-religious, but still grounded in a heritage. Through its professional staff of 140+ personnel, are leaders in providing culturally appropriate services to newcomers, families, women, and seniors. Indus’s services and programs meet the highest international standards and are an indication of the organization’s dedication and commitment to improving the quality of the lives of people served.

Indus is situated in the highly diverse and populated Region of Peel, which is also home to the largest number of human trafficking investigations in Canada. Peel's location within the GTA and its proximity to major highways have contributed to the Region becoming a centre for this type of crime. The Region of Peel is also home to a large international student population because of the high volume of academic institutions in proximity such as Sheridan College, Humber River College, University of Toronto Mississauga Campus, among others. International students are often targeted for exploitation due to language barriers, precarious employment, financial instability, and lack of social connection to the community. Indus has plans to launch a human trafficking prevention project targeted towards international students in the Region of Peel.

The three-year project JUSTICE AND FREEDOM (JAF) to innovate and test activities and practices that support enhanced and appropriate response to the needs of foreign-born at-risk populations and survivors of human trafficking. Specifically, Labour exploitation, domestic servitude and debt bondage. The project aims to create new tools to strengthen cross-sectoral collaboration, thereby bolstering the capacity within the Region of Peel to offer meaningful, comprehensive, and coordinated support to foreign-born at-risk populations, victims, and survivors of human trafficking whose circumstances may also be further complicated by precarious immigration status including but not limited to International students.

In addition to researching gaps in Labour trafficking support services and legislation, the project will collaborate directly with existing anti human trafficking and settlement service providers to exchange knowledge, enhance and provide direct supports to at-risk populations and survivors of human trafficking and to further inform the development of a Labour trafficking toolkit.

Students will conduct research on Canadian and international legislation and/or policies implemented to prevent human trafficking and pinpoint the key differences in similarities between the two. Additional research on city and municipal by-laws that increase the risk of human trafficking will also be conducted to produce a memo. This information will be used to internally further inform research and guide Indus in the development of a Labour trafficking toolkit.

Students may also have the opportunity to create digital tools and resources for community members that provide information on identifying the signs of human trafficking and options to stop the activity. This will be used by community members and other partner organizations such as Peel Police and the Fire Department.

John Howard Society of Toronto - Privacy and Confidentiality Legislation/Policy for Zoom Courts Research Project Criminal, Privacy 1 Legal Research & Writing Upper Years Only Yes Yes https://johnhoward.on.ca/ The John Howard Society of Toronto is committed to providing and developing programs to reduce the social, economic and personal costs of crime. The Society is dedicated to helping all people in conflict with the law and individuals at imminent risk of coming into conflict with the law through service, education and community programs. The John Howard Society is a not-for-profit organization of 19 local offices dedicated to effective, just and humane responses to crime and its causes. The roots of the John Howard Society can be traced back to 18th Century England to a man named John Howard. He began investigating prison conditions – lack of medical care, sanitation, death from disease and starvation. He wrote a paper that was presented to the British House of Parliament entitled “On the State of Prisons in England”. He began the reform movement and continued to devote the rest of his life to prison reform.

The John Howard Society promotes practical, evidence-based policies while providing services, programs and education to all those affected by our criminal justice system. The Toronto office is looking for a student to conduct research and produce a detailed memo answering the following research questions: What laws and policies are currently in place to protect the privacy and confidentiality of clients accessing zoom court for criminal matters? Have these laws and policies been effective or not in supporting communities?

This information will be used internally by the John Howard Society of Toronto to inform resource development for those facing criminal charges and those currently incarcerated. It will also be used to raise awareness on the challenges brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic and criminal justice system.

The student will conduct a review of relevant legislation and jurisprudence and draft a research memo summarizing the findings. A legislative and jurisprudential scan of the legal framework for privacy and confidentiality in zoom courts as applied to criminal courts will also be done. This will involve a review of relevant jurisprudence, summarizing appropriate cases and providing an overarching analysis of jurisprudential trends. This would also involve a review of relevant jurisprudence and drafting of a research memo summarizing the findings to provide insight into both appropriate remedies and the consideration made by the courts in determining what is appropriate for privacy and confidentiality in zoom courts.
Legal Line – Legal Information Review and Revision Project All areas 2 Legal Research & Writing, Public Legal Education N/A Yes Yes https://www.legalline.ca/ Legal Line provides easy-to-understand legal answers written in plain language. Legal Line is a Federal not-for-profit organization providing access to Canadian laws since 1993 and educating the public about the law to advancing access to justice. Legal Line has and continues to advance access to justice for Canadians by publishing free easy-to-understand legal answers written in plain language online. Since 1993, they have provided over 2,100 plain language legal answers to give people the power and confidence they need to make informed decisions that affect their everyday life. Legal Line has crafted legal answers under 47 areas of law that allow people to easily zero in on the specific answer they need. Those who require further assistance are referred to experts such as lawyers, paralegals, government offices, and other professionals.

Given the law is constantly evolving and changing, Legal Line is looking to update and expand the legal information they provide online with the help of law students. Students will assist Legal Line by researching areas of the law that have recently undergone changes, as well as write and review legal information that is currently available on Legalline.ca.

Students will also have the opportunity to support Legal Line in creating short, informative and easy-to-read social media posts to disseminate valuable legal information. This includes creating Instagram posts and Twitter posts.

Legal Line will prepare a work plan with instructions for each separate task.

Students will be researching areas of the law as assigned by the Supervising Lawyer to flag areas that may require updating or amending. These will be shared with the Supervisor and the student will support them in creating plain language legal information resources to be disseminated on their website and social media platforms. All students are closely supervised during all tasks and are given regular feedback on their performance.
Margaret’s Housing Immigration and Refugee Navigation Tool Immigration &Refugee 1 Public Legal Education N/A Yes No https://margarets.ca/ Margaret’s Housing and Community Support Services (“Margaret’s”) is a multi-service agency that provides a continuum of housing options to women living with mental illness and substance use, and innovative community-based support services for individuals experiencing intersectional issues tied to mental health challenges and homelessness. Margaret’s Housing and Community Services (Margaret’s) provide inclusive supportive housing to the most vulnerable women and men in our communities. Margaret’s believes housing is a fundamental social determinant of health. As such, they provide holistic services intended to address the complex nature of the challenges that their clients face.

In Margaret’s respite shelters and drop-in shelters, there may be clients living with mental health challenges who have no immigration status or are only permanent residents. Given these individuals precarious living conditions and health challenges they are at an increased risk of interacting with police and potentially being convicted to certain crimes and being deported. However, for confidentiality reasons Margaret’s cannot inquire into client’s immigration status.

Margaret’s is seeking a student to support the creation of a public legal education tool to navigate the immigration and refugee process for individuals with no immigration status and/or permeant residents. The goal is to use a Steps to Justice Approach for refugee and immigration matters by creating discrete posters and pamphlets that Margaret’s clients can access without disclosing their status.

Students will conduct legal research on immigration and refugee law to create public legal education tools (i.e., posters, pamphlets, etc.). Specifically, students will look into what is required for different refugee claims (i.e., Humanitarian and Compassionate grounds, etc.), the issues that typically come up during these claims, and who clients can contact to receive support. Specifically, students will also draft a memo that outlines the challenges arising during in the immigration and refugee process for people living with mental health challenges, and ways to mitigate these challenges.

Students will also conduct community outreach by compiling a list of organizations in the GTA who can support clients with mental health challenges and criminal complications in their refugee/immigration matters.

Mental Health Law and Criminal Defence Project with Jessyca Greenwood Criminal 1 Client Assistance, Legal Research & Writing Upper Year Only, Pre reqs include taking criminal law courses, Applicants who have worked or will be working for the Crown during the academic year should not apply as there is a conflict of interest. Yes/td> Yes https://www.springlaw.ca/staff-member/jessyca-greenwood/ > Jessyca Greenwood is a skilled trial lawyer in Toronto that vigorously defends her clients from all criminal, regulatory and quasi-criminal charges. Jessyca Greenwood practices law from a holistic and client-centered perspective; she supports her clients at every stage to ensure the best possible outcome in every case. The project’s goal is to provide low-income pro bono clients with access to justice services. The project mainly services vulnerable individuals facing criminal charges or addressing other matters affecting their personal liberty. Clients being served by the project are referred by various social justice organizations such as the St. Michael’s Catch Team, the Duty Counsel offices throughout the province (mainly Toronto Region), and clients of well-known former lawyers with a reputation for assisting on mental health cases.

The project involves work entirely on legal aid or pro bono files which are almost exclusively criminal law files related to mental health. The objective of this project is to research and assess legal outcomes for remote proceedings at the Ontario Review Board. The project will involve investigating and summarizing decisions coming out of these hearings into a memo for the supervising lawyer. This project also involves researching into the following topics:
- Whether or not tribunals can compel individuals to have remote hearings
- Access to justice challenges for vulnerable populations with a focus on those living with mental health challenges

There is also an opportunity to observe remote hearings. Jessyca Greenwood also occasionally assists at administrative tribunals, such as the Parole Board, various Review Boards, and the Criminal Injuries and Compensation Board.

Students will conduct legal research on assigned areas of law and caselaw to assist the supervising lawyer and their clients. This information will be summarized into a memo.

Students will also be involved in case management from an administrative perspective and may be asked to perform some preliminary client intake, as well as disclosure review. As a student’s comfort and familiarity grows, the firm may have them appear in court for the purpose of an administrative adjournment. This will be subject to the comfort level of the student volunteer and the decision of the lawyer supervisor.

No Conversion Canada – Municipal Legislative Powers Across Canada - Map Research Project Queer, Municipal 1 Legal Research & Writing N/A Yes Yes https://www.noconversioncanada.com/ No Conversion Canada is a national, nonpartisan, grassroots organization and registered non-profit dedicated to ending conversion “therapy”/conversion practices in Canada. No Conversion Canada works directly with conversion “therapy” survivors, LGBTQ2+ community, civil society organizations, medical professionals, academics and policymakers to raise awareness about conversion therapy in Canada, develop comprehensive legislation to outlaw this abuse at all levels of government and develop fulsome survivor supports to foster healing. Conversion therapy or conversion practices (also known as “reparative therapy”, “reintegrative therapy” or “aversion therapy”) are any treatment, practice, or sustained effort that has the effect of denying, repressing, discouraging or changing a person’s non-heterosexual sexual orientation, non-cisgender gender identity or gender expression, or any behaviours associated with a gender other than the person’s sex assigned at birth.

Conversion therapy practices are unethical and immoral because they imply that LGBTQ2+ lives are less valuable, less desirable, and less worth living than heterosexual or cisgender persons. Ultimately, these practices believe that being an LGBTQ2+ person is a disorder, sin, or disease that must be fixed, cured, healed, or repaired.

All conversion practices are inherently fraudulent, dangerous and proven to cause harm to their victims. Conversion therapy is opposed by more than 50 professional associations including the Canadian Association of Social Workers, Canadian Psychiatric Association, Canadian Paediatric Society, Canadian Professional Association for Transgender Health, Canadian Psychological Association, College of Registered Psychotherapists of Ontario, Ordre des travailleurs sociaux et thérapeutes conjugaux et familiaux du Québec as well as the United Nations, World Health Organization, the International Rehabilitation Council for Torture Victims and Amnesty International - to name a few.

In Canada, conversion therapy is still legal. While several states and countries around the world have stepped up to ban conversion therapy with criminal legislation, Canada does not have any federal ban on these harmful practices. While some jurisdictions in Canada have taken the first step by banning medical billing or business licences for conversion therapy, these bans do not prevent it from happening. It’s clear a federal ban criminalizing conversion therapy is needed.

No Conversion Canada (NCC) has been instrumental in supporting Bill C-6, which aims to outlaw conversion therapy. However, recent events in passing of Bill C-6 indicate a federal ban on conversation therapy may require another year of deliberation. Thus, NCC is now looking to address bans on conversion therapies through municipal lawmaking powers within Canada. The NCC is seeking a student to conduct research on the legislative powers of municipalities by province and territory. In particular, NCC is looking to gain knowledge on the following:

- The powers municipalities have in each province/territory generally,
- Jurisdiction differences between provinces in relation to the legislative powers of municipalities, specifically in regards to banning conversion practices (see Calgary bylaw as the “gold standard”),
- A summary of the acts that govern the jurisdiction of municipalities

This project also involves supporting NCC’s law reform work to have conversion therapy banned across Canada federally by reaching out to community legal associations and members of the legal profession to sign an open letter in support of a federal ban criminalizing conversion therapy.

The student on this project will conduct research on the legislative powers of Municipalities by province and territory and create a memo on their findings. Students will also have the opportunity to create blog posts on NCC website on their findings to inform municipalities across Canada of how they can stop non-consensual conversion therapy.
Mahdi Weinstock LLP - Pro Bono Immigration/Refugee Project Immigration & Refugee 4 Client Assistance, Legal Research & Writing N/A Yes. Dependant on the COVID-19 restrictions, students will have the opportunity to work at the office in Winter 2022. No N/A Mahdi Weinstock LLP is a full-service Immigration and Refugee law practice aimed at providing reliable, tailored and cost-effective legal services. Mahdi Weinstock LLP is a full-service Immigration and Refugee Law practice aimed at providing reliable, tailored and cost-effective legal services. The firm is dedicated to providing law students with real and practical hands-on experience in the areas of immigration and refugee law.

The project involves working on a variety of pro bono immigration and refugee files, including sponsorship, humanitarian work, Labour Market Impact Assessments (LMIA), refugee and immigration appeals, express entry, and applications for judicial review. All work produced by the students will be remote and reviewed by the lawyer supervisor. There is also the potential to have students involved with remote client intake through preparing questions and observing client calls.

Students who display the interest and ability may have the additional opportunity to observe hearings conducted by staff lawyers. Students who opt to take on this opportunity may be able to offer additional assistance by preparing disclosure packages, under supervision.

Dependant on the COVID-19 restrictions, students will have the opportunity to work at the office in Winter 2022.

Students are expected to complete remote work weekly for the 4-hour shift and provide assistance to staff lawyers with legal research, client communication, and letter drafting under strict supervision. All students are closely supervised during all tasks and are given regular feedback on their performance.
Matthew House Refugee Hearing Preparation Program Immigration & Refugee 6 Client Assistance N/A Yes, however if students are able to attend hearings in person then they will be provided a workspace. ​No matthewhouse.ca Matthew House is a nationally recognized leader in welcoming, assisting, and resettling newly arrived refugee claimants who would otherwise be homeless. Since 2013, Matthew House Toronto has been offering a “simulation” of Refugee Hearings, which completely mirrors the process that takes place at the Immigration and Refugee Board (IRB). To date, close to 1000 refugee claimants have participated in the program. The Matthew House Refugee Hearing Preparation Program’s goal is to support individuals prepare for their Refugee Hearing to increase the chances of a successful outcome. The program is run by well trained volunteers many of whom are lawyers and even retired IRB members. These volunteers play the role of “Board Members” and question the claimants based on their actual Basis of Claim (BOC) narrative submitted several weeks earlier. While there is no “counsel” present, a Hearing Supervisor sits in the room during the simulation and serves as a liaison between the volunteer adjudicator and the claimant and facilitates the feedback and interaction.

In 2019, the RHP conducted 330 hearings which impacted 835 claimants. Before COVID-19 from
January to March 2020 we have completed 96 mock hearings.

Students will observe client mock hearings, liaise with the adjudicator, provide information to clients about the hearing process, and to assist in the expansion of the mock hearing service offered by Mathew House across various Canadian cities. In particular their duties will include:

• Being the voluntary supervisor at hearings
• Walking a claimant through the process step by step
• Providing information about the court process to clients
• Expanding the project virtually to other cities and what that would involve for students

Currently most duties will be remote, but in-person opportunities will potentially arise in the
Winter 2022. Note that in-person activities will only be permitted in accordance with public health directives, and subject to the university/law faculty permitting in-person activities.

Positive Space Network (PSN): Rights Based PLE for LGBTQ+ Youth Accessing Medical Care Queer, Health 2 Public Legal Education N/A Yes Yes www.rockonline.ca ; https://www.positivespacenetwork.ca ROCK is the Lead Agency for the child and youth mental health sector in Halton. We are an accredited, multi-service organization providing services to children and youth from birth to 17 years of age and their families. ROCK aims to improve the lives and relationships of families with children who are having social, emotional and behavioural concerns. At ROCK, we function on a multidisciplinary team basis that may include persons trained in psychology, social work, therapy, occupational therapy, nursing, education, early childhood education, family and individual therapy, and child and youth therapy.

Through education, visibility, awareness, and supportive programming, the Positive Space Network envisions a future in which diverse 2SLGBTQ+ youth, individuals, and families live in a welcoming and supportive community. The Positive Space Network (PSN) is one of the only programs that supports 2SLGBTQ+ youth ages 6-24 in the Halton Region, which includes Burlington, Oakville, Milton, Acton, and Georgetown.

Positive Space Network (PSN) offers unique programs for trans, non-binary and gender-diverse children, youth, and their families, parents or caregivers by offering a monthly drop in called Connections. Our program also holds workshops known as gender journeys that aims to increase connectivity, reduce isolation and discuss gender identity, minority stress and create greater community support.
PSN frequently interacts with youth who identify as trans or non-binary, and are attempting to assert their rights to access appropriate and responsive healthcare. As such, PSN is seeking to develop a plain language, public legal education resource which will provide 2SLGBTQ+ youth with accessible legal information on their rights when accessing medical treatment. Topics which can be researched and included in the resource include, but are not limited to:
• Age of consent when accessing medical treatment;
• Navigating healthcare in relationship to custody rights of the parent;
• Resources for accessing gender affirming healthcare;
• Actions and recourse available to youth who may feel their healthcare rights have been denied.Examples of research questions include:
• What information can a doctor divulge to a youth’s parents, despite doctor-patient confidentiality?
• In regards to hormone blockers, can a trans* youth’s parents prevent them from having this treatment?
• If a healthcare professional does not accommodate trans* lived experience or refuses to be trans competent, what are a patient’s course of action?
• What can be done so gender-affirming medicine/prescriptions and surgeries are covered by medical? These invasive and extensive surgeries are often done out of the country which may bring multiple recovery issues, not to mention such a huge barrier financially and safety concerns for traveling with ID that has their gender assigned at birth.
• What are the options if a parent/guardian (if separated) refuses to use gender-affirming pronouns and acknowledge transition needs.An example of a resource previously developed in partnership with PSN and PBSC can be found here: https://positivespacenetwork.ca/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/Updated-Adult-Name-Change-Guide-1-1.pdf
Student volunteers will be responsible for conducting research on the above mentioned and compile information/ resources related to healthcare. Student volunteers will consolidate this research into a public legal education document which will help users of PSN’s programming to easily understand the processes and documents or information needed to assist with access and navigating healthcare.

In developing this resource, students may have the opportunity to gain interviewing skills and community consultation skills through interviewing stakeholders to help guide the format and content of the final resource. Should this portion of the project occur, student volunteers will receive guidance from the Partner Organization and Supervising Lawyer on respectful, accessible, non-extractive interviewing techniques, privacy considerations, and anti-oppressive transcription techniques.

In the Winter semester, Student volunteers will have the opportunity to present this resource to community members via a remote/web based presentation platform such as Zoom. This presentation will be recorded for future use by the partner organization. Student volunteers will be expected to work with PSN to coordinate an appropriate date/time.
Student volunteers will be required to participate in the Positive Space Network’s training at the outset of the project in October.

Ontario Health ID Access Project with St.Felix Centre - Helping Marginally Housed Individuals Obtain Health Cards Health, Housing, ID 1 Public Legal Education N/A Yes Yes http://stfelixcentre.org/ This project aims to help homeless and marginally housed individuals obtain Ontario health cards to reduce the barriers they face in obtaining health care. Without official documentation, individuals cannot access many healthcare services. This project aims to make the process of obtaining an Ontario health card more accessible and efficient. The Ontario ID Access Project is designed to address the challenge of helping individuals experiencing homelessness and/or marginally housed individuals obtain IDs (specifically health cards) so they may be able to access healthcare, specifically primary care physicians, in Ontario.

While operations remain virtual due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the focus of the project will be to create a resource guide on how to assist marginally housed individuals with obtaining Ontario health cards. The guide will provide a step-by-step process, checklist for documentation needed, and instructions on how to navigate the application system. Different scenarios will be considered such as 1) when an individual does not have any other forms of identification, 2) when an individual does not have a safe space to store their documentation, 3) how the process varies based on citizenship status, and other situations identified by the Partner Organization and Lawyer Supervisor.

Students will conduct research to determine what is needed to complete the application process. If applicable, students may prepare precedents of affidavits for individuals to take to a lawyer if necessary. The resource guide will also include information about obtaining legal counsel and/or how to access legal aid. Part of the research process will involve determining organizations that can vouch for individuals who lack certain pieces of identification needed for this process. Information about how to have the application fee waived will be included in the research and subsequent resource guide.

Once the infrastructure is in place, this project will ideally grow into an in-person clinic. The ultimate goal is to have pop-up ID clinics available at different shelters across Toronto with student volunteers supporting with client intake. The resource guide developed by the student volunteers on this project will be used to inform future plans about expanding the project to in-person clinical operations.

Students will conduct research and develop an accessible resource guide that explains the steps and what is needed for homeless and/or marginally housed individuals to obtain Ontario health cards. Any information and/or materials needed to complete the stages of the “how to guide” that are available to the students will be included. This could include precedents of affidavits or other letters, referrals to other organizations, how to access legal aid, among others identified through the research process.

• Students will work with the Lawyer Supervisor(s) to develop a work plan to establish the division of work, timelines, final deliverables, and deadlines
• Conduct research and compile legal information related to the areas identified by the Partner Organization (and outlined in the project description)
• Consult with Lawyer Supervisor(s) as reasonably needed as questions arise
• Ensure the legal information is plain language, concise, and accessible
• Work as a team to design and create the Reference Guide so that the design and delivery is cohesive

In general, students will be responsible for meeting deadlines, keeping open communication with their Lawyer Supervisor(s), and ensuring they are bringing any delays or concerns to the attention of the Lawyer Supervisor and/or Program Coordinator in a timely fashion.

United Food and Commercial Workers – Mandatory Union Representation for Foreign Workers Research Project Employment, Immigration & Refugee 2 Legal Research & Writing, Law Reform Upper Years Only Yes Yes http://www.ufcw.ca/index.php?lang=en UFCW Canada is a workers’ organization that leads and is empowered by the voice and goals of the membership. UFCW’s mission is to secure and promote fairness, safety, diversity, and dignity for every member. The Union will champion labour and human rights and serve the needs of the members, Local Unions, officers and staff through dynamic resources and services. We share the commitment to achieve a just workplace through collective bargaining, inclusiveness, and compassion for the broader community. For 30 years, UFCW Canada has been the leading voice and advocate for agricultural workers, both domestic and migrant workers. Along with the Agriculture Workers Alliance (AWA), UFCW Canada operates North America’s largest agricultural worker’s association with over 13,000 members. In the specific case of migrant agricultural workers, UFCW Canada has helped protect their rights and enforce their entitlements, while advocating for changes to the laws which still today, contribute to worker vulnerability and employment insecurity.

Canada has seen a continuous expansion of the migrant and temporary foreign workforce incorporate agriculture under federal programs that deliver migrant workers to employers, and then fail to provide adequate protections and supports. In 2012 the ESDC issued 39,700 permits for migrant farmworkers. In 2019 that number had risen to 72,000. Yet, the labour and workplace rights of agricultural workers are far too often expressly excluded, making migrant agricultural workers more vulnerable than the general Canadian workforce, as their legal rights and entitlements are fewer. As a result, Canada’s migrant agriculture workers work in conditions where exploitation and abuse are common.

In June 2019, the federal government’s response to this was the introduction of the open work permit for victims of employer abuse. This program grants an open work permit of one year to migrant workers under the Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program (SAWP) and Temporary Foreign Worker Program (TFWP) who have experienced or are experiencing any type of abuse, such as physical, psychological, sexual, or financial. However, as these permits are only temporary, they do not address the long-term need of workers for protection and fair labour.

To promote the fair treatment of Canada’s agricultural workers, the UFCW published a report in 2020 outlined several urgent and significant reforms at both the federal and provincial levels. UFCW’s main demand/recommendation is to make union representation a mandatory element of the TFWP. For this project, the UFCW is looking for students to conduct legal research to support each of the reforms made in the report, as well as conduct international research on best practices for migrant workers policies and legislation. A sample of the reforms to be researched include:
(1) Make mandatory union representation an element of the TFWP
o How does federal jurisdiction over immigration and provincial jurisdiction over labour and employment impact the passing of mandatory union representation in relation to migrant agricultural workers?
o How would deportation and reparation function under the union?
(2) Establish a federal tribunal to properly allow for the review and appeal of repatriation decisions in advance of TFWs being sent home by employers;
o Research exploring different models of a federal tribunals and determining the strengths and weaknesses of each.
(3) Sign the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families, which was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in December 1990;
o What does the convention require and is Canada meeting those requirements?
o To what extent does Canada comply or not comply with the conventions?
o Why should Canada sign?
(4) Repeal Ontario’s Agricultural Employees Protection Act. The Ontario Labour Relations Act must be amended to include agricultural workers, or the Agricultural Labour Relations Act should be revived to truly respect the collective bargaining rights of agricultural workers;
(5) Improve housing standards for migrant workers in recognition of the apparent dangers associated with their current living standards such as living in buildings housing chemicals, fertilizers, boilers, industrial fans and/or heaters.
o Specific attention should be paid to the changes recommended due to COVID-19 precautions.

This information will be used by UFCW to make a more persuasive ask of political leaders.

Students will conduct a review of relevant legislation, jurisprudence, and policies that support the reforms outlined by the UFCW and draft a research memo summarizing the findings. Students will also identify best practices for migrant workers policies and legislation and identify current practices in place globally.
WellFort Community Health Services – Legal Navigation Tools Immigration & Refugee 1 Public Legal Education N/A Yes Yes www.wellfort.ca WellFort is our community, the clients we serve, and the service we provide. WellFort works alongside local residents and partner agencies to increase community capacity. As a not-for-profit, values-based organization, they provide:
• Health Promotion & Programs
• Primary Health Care
• Oral Health Care
• Diabetes, HIV & HEP C Education
WellFort Community Health Services vision is to create a healthier community where everyone belongs. Their role within the health care system is to facilitate integrated care for non-insured clients and populations with complex needs. Many non-insured individuals are new immigrants, and those experiencing homelessness. Presently, WellFort has identified the need for educational session for staff (i.e., system navigators and social workers) and clients on the following topics:
• Immigration processes, forms, procedures, and rights
• Housing law issues (i.e., unlawful evictions, landlord/tenant rights and responsibilities)
• Social Assistance Law (i.e., understanding the tribunal process for pursuing assistance for Ontario Works, Ontario Disability Support Program, and/or Canadian Pension Plan after eligibility is denied)WellFort is seeking a student to conduct research on the above-mentioned topics and deliver virtual educational sessions to staff and clients to increase knowledge capacity among the organization and community
Students will conduct legal research on assigned areas of law to create public legal education sessions for WellFort staff and clients. They will also delivery education sessions to staff and clients on a pre-determined schedule.
The 519 Public Legal Education Project Queer, Housing, Employment 1 Public Legal Education N/A Yes Yes http://www.the519.org/ The 519 is committed to the health, happiness and full participation of the LGBTQ2S communities. A City of Toronto agency with an innovative model of Service, Space and Leadership, we strive to make a real difference in people’s lives, while working to promote inclusion, understanding and respect. The 519 serves LGBTQ2S+ folx in the Greater Toronto Area who may be facing barriers to justice. As a result of service delivery switching to a virtual format, The 519 has expanded the scope of its services to broader geographic regions outside of Toronto. In doing so, The 519 has identified a need for more accessible, plain language, public legal education (PLE) content that is queer-positive and affirming, and responsive to changing legal issues stemming from the pandemic.
Examples of research topics for PLE content include, but are not limited to:
- Landlord & Tenant Rights
- Employment Law
- Harassment and Sexual Assault in the workplace
- Trans ID Inquiries (Information workshops on name
Student volunteers will be responsible for conducting legal research, and drafting plain language PLE content including presentations. All PLE content should be prepared in plain language and avoid the use of legalese so as to be accessible to The 519’s clientele. As student volunteers gain familiarity with the topic matter and complete PLE content, they will be responsible for delivering PLE presentations in pairs of at least two (2) student volunteers.
Students can expect to complete approximately one (1) PLE presentation per month once PLE content is developed.
Student volunteers must include a disclaimer on all PLE content stating:"Student volunteers are only permitted to answer questions from attendees if their responses have been pre-approved by the lawyer supervisor. Any questions where answers have not been pre-approved by the lawyer supervisor must be referred to the lawyer supervisor for follow-up, as student volunteers are not permitted to answer questions which may constitute legal advice."Student volunteers will be expected to meet with the partner organization at least once per month to provide and update and seek guidance as needed. Student volunteers should take the initiative to schedule pre-determined meeting times with the partner organization contact at the outset of their placement.
The 519 Trans ID Clinic Queer 2 Client Assistance N/A Yes Yes http://www.the519.org/ The 519 is committed to the health, happiness and full participation of the LGBTQ2S communities. A City of Toronto agency with an innovative model of Service, Space and Leadership, we strive to make a real difference in people’s lives, while working to promote inclusion, understanding and respect. The Trans ID Clinic provides free legal information, form-filling services and referrals in a learning space that strives to be trans-positive, non-judgmental, anti-oppressive and inclusive. PBSC law student volunteers and lawyer supervisors work collaboratively to assist trans and gender diverse individuals with obtaining new pieces of identification. Students will meet with clients via Webex from their home. During the meeting, they will assist clients to fill in gender marker applications. Students will use a 519 email address when emailing clients and if required to telephone a client, will do so from a blocked number. Students are not permitted to give out their personal contact information to clinic clients.

Student volunteers will be expected to meet with the partner organization at least once per month to provide and update and seek guidance as needed. Student volunteers should take the initiative to schedule pre-determined meeting times with the partner organization contact at the outset of their placement.

The 519 Refugee Mock Hearing Program Queer, Immigration & Refugee 2 Client Assistance Upper Year Only Yes No http://www.the519.org/ The 519 is committed to the health, happiness and full participation of the LGBTQ2S communities. A City of Toronto agency with an innovative model of Service, Space and Leadership, we strive to make a real difference in people’s lives, while working to promote inclusion, understanding and respect. Over the past decade there have been various legislative changes that have resulted in significantly increased wait times for refugee claimants from the time of application to the date of their hearing. The 519 Refugee Mock Hearing Program provides support to LGBTQI+ refugee claimants. These individuals are claimants who are awaiting hearing before the Refugee Protection Division (RPD) of the IRB, and entering Canada seeking refugee status on the basis of their sexual orientation and/or gender identity (i.e. SOGI claimants).

This program provides claimants with the opportunity to go through a “mock hearing” with the Student Volunteers and lawyer supervisor, who is the client’s actual lawyer and will be representing the client at their hearing before the RPD. The objective is to familiarize claimants with the hearing process in a safe setting, and provide the claimant with an opportunity to take a critical look at the implications of their claim.

Student Volunteers will be expected to review the claimant’s Basis of Claim (BoC) prior to each mock hearing. They will also be expected to review the IRB’s National Documentation Package for the claimant’s country of origin. Student Volunteers will then identify any key issues and draft questions which can be explored during the mock hearing. Students will be expected to consult with their supervising lawyer prior to each mock hearing.
Total Prep time prior to each mock hearing: 4-5 hours
During the hearing, Student Volunteers will play the role of observer. This will entail providing a brief introduction and explanation of the hearing process, taking notes during the mock hearing, and debriefing with the client and supervising lawyer to provide feedback. Depending on the student’s comfort level, there may be an opportunity to play the role of adjudicator as the student progresses, allowing the Supervising Lawyer to take on the role of counsel for the claimant. *Note: this will be at the discretion of the Partner Organization and Supervising Lawyer. Mock hearings will be approximately 3 hours long, and determined on fixed dates in conjunction with the Partner Organization.
Total time during each mock hearing: ~3-4 hours.
COVID-19 and Virtual Hearings
All mock hearings will be conducted virtually using the 519’s Webex platform, through which the Supervising Lawyer, Student Volunteer, and client will have the opportunity to connect. Student Volunteers and Supervising Lawyers will also have the opportunity to connect either via phone or Webex at their discretion.
Mock Hearing Dates
Generally, mock hearings take place on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from 5:30 – 8:30 p.m. EDT. Student Volunteers will be assigned two (2) Mock Hearings per month, and are expected to work with the Partner Organization to determine which dates are most appropriate. Student Volunteers are expected to arrive at 5:00 p.m. EDT - thirty (30) minutes prior to the hearing – to ensure sufficient time to connect with the Partner Organization contact and discuss any questions they may have.
Student volunteers will be expected to meet with the partner organization at least once per month to provide and update and seek guidance as needed. Student volunteers should take the initiative to schedule pre-determined meeting times with the partner organization contact at the outset of their placement.
St. Michael's Hospital Academic Family Health Team: Health Justice Program Wills & Estates, Health 1 Client Assistance; Legal Research & Writing Upper Year Only; Pre-req includes Wills and Estates Yes No http://www.stmichaelshospital.com/programs/familypractice/health-justice-program.php The Health Justice Program aims to address the overlapping health and justice needs of our community. Recognizing systemic inequalities in our society and unfairness experienced by individuals living in poverty, we believe that the intertwined nature of health and justice issues affects the basic human rights of individuals with low income. In partnership with our patients, clients and community groups, we engage in direct service, legal education and law reform activities to fulfill our mission. The Health Justice Program is a partnership between St. Michael's Hospital Academic Family Health Team, St. Michael's Hospital and legal clinics ARCH Disability Law Centre, Aboriginal Legal Services Toronto, HIV & AIDS Legal Clinic of Ontario and Neighbourhood Legal Services. The partnership is funded through Legal Aid Ontario with in-kind contributions from all partners.

The Neighbourhood Legal Services is seeking students to draft wills, powers of attorney for property and personal care, and reporting letters for low-income individuals͘. Clients will be referred through St͘ Michael’s Hospital Family Health Team sites͘. There will also be opportunities to research and create public legal education (PLE) workshops on wills & estates.

PBSC student volunteers will be paired with lawyers specializing in wills and estates law to complete all their work. Student volunteers will remotely work two clinic shifts each month and will gain experience in interviewing, drafting, and working with marginalized clients, with the guidance of an experienced estates lawyer.

Students are expected to work 3-5 hours a week on drafting the requested documents. Students will conduct interviews through a video conference as the clients will be located at St͘ Michael’s Hospital͘. At the time of completion, the student may be called in to sign the will as a witness, but if this is not possible then other organizational partners will fulfill this requirement. They will also engage in substantive learning regarding wills and estates. Students will have to check in on Friday mornings with their supervisors.

Student volunteers will research, create and organize public legal education (PLE) workshops on wills & estates. Students will schedule and present these workshops at local community organizations if permissible by governmental, institutional, and organizational regulations throughout the year. All PLE content will be reviewed and approved by a supervising lawyer prior to public delivery.

Rainbow Railroad Intake Project Queer, Immigration & Refugee 1 Client Assistance Upper Years Only Yes No www.rainbowrailroad.org Rainbow Railroad exists to support persecuted LGBTQI+ individuals in more than 30 different countries to resettle to safety. We do this by: providing info to LGBTQI+ people on routes to safety and resources on seeking asylum and refugee status; providing much needed moral support and, when funds permit, short-term financial support to LGBT people living in hiding before travel; and providing the means for travel to safe countries in North America and Europe then connect them with settlement agencies once there. In countries all over the world, lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans-identified (LGBTI) people live in basic fear for their freedom, their safety and their lives. They often have nowhere to turn because their government and police not only tolerate but encourage this brutality. Rainbow Railroad exists to help these people get out of danger to somewhere safe. In the spirit of and with homage to the Underground Railroad, the mission of the Rainbow Railroad is to help LGBT people as they seek safe haven from state enabled violence, murder or persecution. We support, provide information, and help to arrange safe transportation for these LGBT people to somewhere in the world where they can live their lives in safety.

Rainbow Railroad receives hundreds of requests for help every year from countries where LGBT individuals are open targets of violence. Because the volume of requests is so high, we focus our efforts on assisting LGBT people who have faced physical violence or face an imminent threat of violence, imprisonment, or death. We have been successful in helping individuals from the Caribbean, Africa, South-Central Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe, and the Middle East where we have local networks to support and validate cases.

Students will assist Rainbow Railroad staff with client intake, researching specific immigration-related legal questions in order to provide legal information, form filling, and gathering and compiling client legal documentation in support of Rainbow Road’s work in providing information to LGBT people on routes to safety and resources on seeking asylum, providing means for travel to safe countries in North America and Europe, and building relationships between them and settlement agencies once there.

Coordinate with lawyer supervisor and staff at Rainbow Railroad to determine needs and expectations
- Assist with client intake by responding to research questions, assisting with form filling, and gathering necessary information/documentation to support the client’s file
- Request feedback and support when needed
- Notify the lawyer supervisor and/or Program Coordinator of any issues or delays as soon as possiblePursuant to PBSC Policy 2, students are not permitted to give legal advice. Students will ensure they understand the difference between legal advice and legal information, and will be closely supervised by a lawyer supervisor wherever client facing operations occur. Students will not provide legal advice and will be sure to consult with their lawyer supervisor if situations arise where they are unsure about what they can provide.
Rainbow Railroad Research Project Queer, Immigration & Refugee 1 Legal Research & Writing,Public Legal Education Upper Years Only Yes No www.rainbowrailroad.org Rainbow Railroad exists to support persecuted LGBTQI+ individuals in more than 30 different countries to resettle to safety. We do this by: providing info to LGBTQI+ people on routes to safety and resources on seeking asylum and refugee status; providing much needed moral support and, when funds permit, short-term financial support to LGBT people living in hiding before travel; and providing the means for travel to safe countries in North America and Europe then connect them with settlement agencies once there. Rainbow Railroad receives hundreds of requests for help every year from countries where LGBT individuals are open targets of violence. Because the volume of requests is so high, we focus our efforts on assisting LGBT people who have faced physical violence or face an imminent threat of violence, imprisonment, or death. We have been successful in helping individuals from the Caribbean, Africa, South-Central Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe, and the Middle East where we have local networks to support and validate cases.

Students will assist Rainbow Railroad staff with legal research around immigration laws in countries where our clients reside. Students may compose briefing documents on specific sets of immigration and human rights laws for non-lawyer staff in order to enhance understanding of conditions and relationships in these countries. Students may also assist lawyers and caseworkers in drafting cover letters and immigration claim summaries. All legal research and draft cover letters will be reviewed and approved by the supervising lawyer prior to use by the partner organization.

These activities will support Rainbow Road’s work in providing information to LGBT people on routes to safety and resources on seeking asylum, providing means for travel to safe countries in North America and Europe, and building relationships between them and settlement agencies once there.

Coordinate with lawyer supervisor and staff at Rainbow Railroad to determine which legal research questions need addressing
- Provide plain language memos in response to legal research questions assigned
- Assist lawyers and caseworkers with letter drafting when requested
- Provide immigration claim summaries when requested
- Request feedback and support when needed
- Notify the lawyer supervisor and/or Program Coordinator of any issues or delays as soon as possible
Neighbourhood Legal Services (NLS) & Health Justice Program Intake & Affidavit Project Poverty, Health 1 Client Assistance N/A Yes. However, should public health and law faculty directives permit, students will be available to meet in person at the office. No http://www.nlstoronto.org/ NLS is a non-profit and independent community legal clinic that has been serving the community since 1973. They provide free legal services and assistance to low-income individuals who live within their catchment area (Downtown, East of Yonge) and qualify for their services. Its signature outreach partnership, the Health Justice Program, sees our staff embedded in the Family Health Team at St. Mike’s in order to facilitate warm referrals for low-income patients seeking legal help. The Health Justice Program is a partnership between St. Michael's Hospital Academic Family Health Team, St. Michael's Hospital and legal clinics ARCH Disability Law Centre, Aboriginal Legal Services Toronto, HIV & AIDS Legal Clinic of Ontario and Neighbourhood Legal Services. The partnership is funded through Legal Aid Ontario with in-kind contributions from all partners.

Neighbourhood Legal Services/Health Justice Program is seeking a student to perform client intakes and draft affidavits once a week for 3-5 hour virtual shifts. The affidavits will typically be related to testifying the applicant’s income for rent calculation in public housing, but students may also assist with statutory declarations related to the CRA, immigration, and OSAP. Conducting intakes will be preceded with training in our case management system, trauma-informed practice, and our process for pre-vetting and booking clients in with lawyers.

Should public health policy and university/faculty directives permit the resumption of in-person activities, students will be permitted to attend in person at Neighbourhood Legal Services clinic or the Health Justice Program office to complete their shifts.

Students will be conducting client intake and drafting affidavits.
Neighbourhood Legal Services (NLS) Tenant Application Student Support Project Housing, Poverty 1 Client Assistance N/A Virtual during the Fall however, in-person presence is required for the winter term. No http://www.nlstoronto.org/ NLS is a non-profit and independent community legal clinic that has been serving the community since 1973. They provide free legal services and assistance to low-income individuals who live within their catchment area (Downtown, East of Yonge) and qualify for their services. Its signature outreach partnership, the Health Justice Program, sees our staff embedded in the Family Health Team at St. Mike’s in order to facilitate warm referrals for low-income patients seeking legal help. Students will work as part of the NLS Tenant Application Student Support project, a project designed to assist low-income tenants in accessing the legal system to improve standards of maintenance and repair in their units and buildings.

COVID-19
Student volunteers will be permitted to participate in-person at the clinic office only subject to the presence of physical-distancing and other safety measures that reduce the risk of the spread and contraction of COVID-19, including mandatory wearing of masks. Measures that will be in place at the clinic are plexiglass for client-facing parts of the clinic, masks, hand sanitizer and reduced numbers of staff present.

The partnership may be cancelled upon such time that either the Provincial government or the University of Toronto issues directives that make the students’ participation in-person at the clinic impossible. This may include more stringent directives on gathering sizes, the closing of businesses and places of work, or the suspension of other academic activities.

Students will conduct structured client interviews and assist tenants in gathering information and evidence and developing a case chronology for assessment by supervising lawyers. If time permits, students may be asked to assist in the drafting of applications and pleadings.

For the final deliverable of the project, students will prepare an intake package consisting of a completed client interview sheet, case summary, and supporting documentation for review and assessment by the supervising lawyer. If time permits, students will also draft pleadings for a tenant application for review and assessment by the supervising lawyer.

The Ontario Deputy Judges Association (ODJA) Legal Internship Program All areas 1 Legal Research & Writing Upper Years Only Yes No https://odja.ca The Ontario Deputy Judges Association serves the needs of the Ontario Deputy Judges of the Small Claims Court of Ontario. Component 1:
The ODJA provides their members with resources to assist in decision-making. There are two resource lists that are out of date: 1) Caswell Seminar materials and documents, and 2) research memorandums created by Student Volunteers from previous years. The ODJA is requesting one Student Volunteer to assist with updating these lists to ensure the resources are relevant and on point. Therefore, this project will consist of:
- Legal research and writing
- Legal analysis
- Organizing and increasing efficiency in the user experience of these resourcesComponent 2:
In addition, it is anticipated that the courts will begin opening up towards the end of 2021. This means that additional research opportunities may arise as the project progresses and the situation with COVID-19 evolves. These research opportunities will assist Deputy Judges in Ontario as members of the ODJA in specific areas as requested. Research topics from various areas of procedural and substantive law may arise, including:
- Costs
- Contempt
- Powers of judges
- Damages
- Medical malpractice
- Product liability
- Limitation periods
- Constructive trust
- Quantum Meruit
All research, papers, resources, and research results (“work product”) will become property of ODJA, who retains the benefit of all work product. The student will be introduced to the Deputy Judge who made the research request via email. The student will submit the work products directly to the Deputy Judge who requested it and inform the lawyer supervisor that the task is complete. The lawyer supervisor will be available to answer questions and provide mentorship as needed through this process. The student will have the opportunity to receive feedback from the involved Deputy Judge on their research memoranda by telephone or email. The student is responsible for requesting feedback from the Deputy Judge, but the lawyer supervisor will be available to help facilitate this process if necessary.
Component 1: Update the two master lists of resources (as outlined above) used by Deputy Judges in Ontario to assist in decision-making in matters heard at Small Claims Court.

Component 2: Respond to research opportunities as they arise and produce legal memorandum to be utilized by ODJA members.

PBSC: GTA Wills Project Wills & Estates, Property 4 Client Assistance Students are required to have completed or be concurrently enrolled in a Wills & Estates class Yes No N/A N/A This project is run by Pro Bono Students Canada (PBSC), and supported by Mary Wahbi at Fogler, Rubinoff LLP, with support by other lawyers who provide supervision. The project’s goal is to provide legal services related to estate planning for low income individuals, and to provide students with the opportunity to offer client services in the estate planning field. PBSC Students are paired with lawyers specializing in Wills & Estates law to draft wills, powers of attorney for property and personal care, and reporting letters for low-income individuals.
METRAC Public Legal Education & Research Project Womens, Family 2 Public Legal Education N/A Yes, however if public-health measures ease during the 2020-2021 academic year, it is possible that the terms for enabling some in-person and on-site PLE presentations by students can be revisited, renegotiated and revised as mutually agreed between PBSC, METRAC and student-volunteers. Such revisions to the contractual arrangements are subject to both Government and University guidelinesthat may be put in place, prohibiting the operation of any in-person academic adjacent activities. Yes www.metrac.org ; www.owjn.org ; www.onefamilylaw.ca METRAC is an Ontario based non-profit organization (located in Toronto) in operation since 1984 working to end violence towards women and youth and have extended services to Two-Spirit, Nonbinary and trans people as of 1995. Our current violence prevention and intervention activities are focused on advancing safety, justice, and equity through education, outreach, community safety initiative, research, and social policy work. The Community Justice Program develops, produces and distributes legal information in clear language for vulnerable individuals, groups and their service providers, to learn about how the law and legal systems work to protect people from gender-based violence. The project will centre on preparing and presenting Public Legal Education (PLE) presentations for Toronto area community groups, including shelters for women affected by partner violence.
The final outputs of the project may include PLE PowerPoint presentations and/or other written resources, which will be used by student to conduct legal information presentations for the community. PLE presentations will explain in clear language, various aspects of the law and legal processes that women are likely to encounter, some of which may be related to information posted on the OWJN and FLEW websites. (www.owjn.org/; www.onefamilylaw.ca). The final outputs of the project may include PLE PowerPoint presentations and/or other written resources, which will be used by student to conduct legal information presentations for the community. Students may also prepare articles, case-comments or blog-style posts on various legal issues in collaboration with METRAC staff.
Students will work with METRAC’s legal information materials, to conduct legal research and to develop and adapt new presentation materials as needed.
COVID-19
Students would typically give in-person PLE presentations attended and supervised by a METRAC lawyer, and held with community groups in various locations, including women’s shelters. Due to current public-health measures to reduce the risks of infection spread from the COVID-19 virus, students will conduct their PLE presentations live through Zoom online connections, as a viable alternative to in-person presentations. This way, students’ learning and practice experiences will continue within a safe and least disruptive context, while placement outcomes remain impactful.
Students will create a mutually beneficial learning environment for diverse communities of women whereby they can learn about various aspects of the law and legal processes that women and children affected by violence are likely to encounter. Students supported and supervised by METRAC’s lawyers, will lead PLE presentations (not legal advice) through interactive and face-to-face exchanges between students and community members, for the purpose of building live client-facing skills; and to allow for questions to be answered (subject to PBSC policies prohibiting the giving of legal advice by student volunteers).
Rexdale Community Legal Clinic Housing, Poverty 2 Client Assistance N/A Yes No http://www.rexdalecommunitylegalclinic.ca/ Rexdale CLC provides legal services to low-income communities in North Etobicoke, carried out by lawyers, paralegals and community legal workers, including public legal education and law reform. Rexdale CLC has two distinct priority service areas. The students will assist with Priority A – Tenant Remedies as their primary objective but must be ready to shift to Priority B – Public Legal Education, depending on demand. The primary focus for students will be in the form of client intake for housing law, specifically assisting in tenant rights issues. Phone call intake will be conducted by students in a private location, using a private number, and will involve leading extended interviews to help clients complete various forms. All work will be sent for review to a supervisor and will be saved in Rexdale CLC’s secure network. No clinic work will be saved on students’ personal computers. There will also be opportunities for students to complete some legal research and such research may be used to generate materials for virtual public legal education sessions or specific casework.

Priority A Tenant Remedies:
The clinic experiences a demand for tenant remedies that its staff cannot meet. Representation in tenant repair or abatement matters is very rarely given. Only information or advice is generally given. This project enables the clinic to expand its services to advice, form-filling and guided instruction for self-representation. However, student volunteers are not permitted to give legal advice. Students will follow these steps, with the guidance of lawyers, paralegals, and community legal workers:
• Learn clinic’s client intake process by shadowing intake workers for the first two visits, learn clinic’s case selection criteria.
• Perform research on completion of Landlord & Tenant Board (LTB) forms and processes, applicable statute law and regulations.
• Schedule phone calls with clients identified by clinic intake as needing support in seeking tenant remedies: First, meetings with clients will be assisted by clinic caseworkers. Later, the students will independently meet with clients and provide information on LTB processes and common procedures. Students will only be responsible for providing clients with legal information so that clients can adequately prepare themselves to self-represent at LTB and will not be assisting them with the details of their case directly. Any case-specific questions will be referred to one or both of the supervising lawyers.
• Interview tenants, providing these case details to the clinic lawyers, and completing forms with tenants.
• For repair applications, learn steps tenants should follow before filing application to document their claim, how to use Municipal Licensing inspectors, photography, etc.
• Inform tenants on process for serving and filing forms and next steps.

Although all staff will assist in ensuring students have sufficient knowledge and information to complete their tasks, primary responsibility of oversight will rest with the lawyer supervisors.

Priority B – Public Legal Education
Part of our clinic’s mandate is to prove public legal education in the community. This generally involves sessions at the Rexdale Hub, partner agencies, or in local community locations such as apartment buildings. We continue to provide this service virtually and students will be asked to research and help prepare for public legal education sessions.

Given the significant volume of work identified in Priorities A and B, it is unlikely students will be required to complete additional work. However, if there are lulls in demand for Priorities A and B, students may assist with intake, research or form filling for Small Claims or immigration forms, to support the casework (other forms that may need to be filled out are Criminal Injuries Compensation Board (CICB) applications, Child Tax Benefit forms, etc. dependent on the clients that seek the clinic’s services). Should the student participate in clinic intake, hours will be scheduled upon mutual agreement, and a clinic lawyer will be present during the student’s shifts to supervise.

Students will be required to assist in client intake, to conduct legal research, and to create materials for public legal education sessions. The student will be expected to observe the clinic’s intake processes and learn their roles with respect to assisting intake staff, copying documents, etc. Note that these administrative tasks will not exceed 10% of the student’s total assigned workload. Students will primarily be expected to conduct the administrative tasks related to their own work.
HIV Legal Network – Criminal, Charter and Human Rights Law Research Project Queer, Constitutional 1 Legal Research & Writing Upper Years Only Yes Yes http://www.hivlegalnetwork.ca/ The HIV Legal Network promotes the human rights of people living with, at risk of or affected by HIV or AIDS, in Canada and internationally, through research and analysis, litigation and other advocacy, public education and community mobilization. They envision a world in which the human rights and dignity of people living with HIV or AIDS and those affected by the disease are fully realized and in which laws and policies facilitate HIV prevention, care, treatment and support. The HIV Legal Network project will be divided into two distinct research topics; the student will work on them concurrently throughout their placement.

TOPIC #1 Constitutional Challenges to Anti-Sodomy Laws – Jamaica & Dominica
This topic involves comparative legal research in support of two constitutional challenges to anti- sodomy laws in the Caribbean (Jamaica, Dominica). Research on this topic would support two court cases that the HIV Legal Network is spearheading in Jamaica and Dominica, which challenge laws that criminalize same-sex intimacy in those countries.

TOPIC #2: Support Research for a Charter, Prison and/or Criminal Law Issue
This topic involves legal research in support of either a Charter, Prison and/or Criminal law case, where HIV Legal Network is acting as an intervenor or as a co-applicant. This involves conducting research in for a Charter, Prison and/or Criminal law issue to support law reform in a specified area to be determined between the student and lawyer supervisor.

In addition to legal research, students will have the opportunity to write media articles and blog posts for HIV Legal Network’s website.

The student will be required to conduct and complete research memos on one of the assigned topics.

TOPIC #1:
The student will research jurisprudence of relevance to the constitutional challenges underway, focusing on cases in Jamaica, Dominica, Canada and likely other Commonwealth jurisdictions. In particular, the student will be asked to review and analyze recent court decisions addressing LGBTQ rights around the world. Their findings will be encapsulated in the form of one or more research memos summarizing their findings.

Topic #2:
The student will produce one or more research memos in support of either a Charter, Prison and/or Criminal public interest litigation.

Inclusion Canada: Disability Case Monitoring Project Human Rights, Disability 1 Legal Research & Writing Upper Years Only Yes No https://inclusioncanada.ca/ Inclusion Canada is a family-based association assisting people with an intellectual disability and their families to lead the way in advancing inclusion in their own lives and in their communities. We are dedicated to attaining full participation in community life, ending exclusion and discrimination on the basis of intellectual disability, promoting respect for diversity and advancing human rights to ensure equality for all Canadians. Inclusion Canada is the national federation working to advance the full inclusion and human rights of people with an intellectual disability and their families. Part of this work involves strategic interventions in courts across the country.
Inclusion Canada maintains a national Strategic Litigation Advisory Committee composed of leading legal experts on disability law and equality. The task of the committee is to determine appropriate cases for intervention by CACL. The Committee’s mandate is informed by the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and s. 15 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
Inclusion Canada considers interventions in cases that relate to the rights of persons with a disability directly and cases that have the potential to impact equality law generally. CACL is looking for students to help identify and provide summaries of cases that may fit into either of these categories for internal committee use. This will be done through monitoring of court websites across the country to identify cases that might fall into either of these two categories.
CACL has a long history of interventions at the Supreme Court of Canada, recent cases include:
S.A. v. Metro Vancouver Housing Corporation, 2017 CanLII 76788 (SCC), concerning whether a trust is an asset for the purposes of determining eligibility for subsidized rent.Carter v. Canada (Attorney General), [2016] 1 SCR 13, 2016 SCC 4, concerning a section 7 Charter challenge to sections 241 and 14 of the Criminal Code which criminalized assisted suicide and thus prohibited medical assistance in dying in Canada.R. v. Nur, [2015] 1 SCR 773, 2015 SCC 15, concerning a section 12 Charter challenge to mandatory minimum sentences for certain firearm offences in the Criminal Code.R v. D.A.I, [2012] 1 SCR 149, 2012 SCC 5, a case involving the test for competence to testify in the context of a sexual assault complainant with an intellectual disability.Moore v. British Columbia (Education), [2012] 3 SCR 360, 2012 SCC 61, in which the Court determined that students with disabilities who require accommodation had a right to equal access to public education services.Through its interventions, Inclusion Canada has played an active role in Canadian courts and tribunals in an effort to promote a disability- informed lens to disputes about equality.
Student Volunteers will support the Strategic Litigation Committee by monitoring disability and equality related caselaw from their assigned regions. Students Volunteers will be assigned several Canadian jurisdictions to monitor and will do so by reviewing appellate and superior court websites and recent court judgments. Inclusion Canada will provide a series of questions that will guide case summaries.

Depending on the needs of the partner organization, students may be also be asked to conduct legal research and prepare short legal memoranda to support internal litigation strategies on issues related to section 7 Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms arguments.

The Osgoode Student volunteer will be responsible for reviewing and summarizing cases from Ontario.

Students will be expected to prepare case summaries to be submitted monthly and update an Excel spreadsheet to the Supervising Lawyer.
*NOTE: all case summaries produced by the Student Volunteers will be exclusively for the purpose of internal use by the partner organization. Case summaries will not be relied on for legal advice, and will not be circulated externally to the general public.

Winkler Institute – Court System Review Administrative, Family 2 Legal Research & Writing, Public Legal Education N/A Yes No https://winklerinstitute.ca/ Based at Osgoode Hall Law School, the Winkler Institute for Dispute Resolution is a vibrant center for research on innovation in dispute resolution, access to justice and the future of the legal profession. Their projects range from exploring the potential for human-centered design and legal technology to transform justice services, to innovation in ADR and dispute prevention, to new ways of thinking about the profession, legal education and empowerment.

Additionally, the Institute is closely tied in both mission and operation with the Osgoode Mediation Intensive Program and Clinic and its Small Claims Court Mediation Program. Since opening its doors in 2014, the Winkler Institute has become a leading voice in Canadian justice innovation and reform.

The court system has changed drastically as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, and has had implications on parties who are looking to resolve legal and interpersonal conflicts.

Students will work with the Winkler Institute for Dispute Resolution in conducting a jurisdictional scan of how court systems have adapted in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic and identify best practices. This information would then be disseminated through their blog (and any other channels that they deem beneficial), and sent to governmental and decision-making bodies (like MAG, for example).

Students will conduct a jurisdictional scan, both national and international, of how courts have adapted (or not) in the past year and a half as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Students will also identify models of innovation and collect a set of best practices.
WomenatthecentrE: Transformative Justice for Gender-Based Violence & Support for Survivors of Human Trafficking Criminal, Womens 2 Public Legal Education, Legal Research & Writing N/A Yes No www.womenatthecentre.com WomenatthecentrE is a unique non-profit organization that works to eradicate gender-based violence against women, gender queer, 2 spirited and trans people. WomenatthecentrE is the first survivor-led organization in Canada dedicated to ensuring the voices and expertise of survivors are central in the implementation and development of policies and programs aimed at eradicating all forms of gender violence. With over 4000+ members across the world engaging in personal, political, and social advocacy, WomenatthecentrE thrives on membership engagement and shared experiences that come together to create valuable change in our communities. Overview
This project will primarily support WomenatthecentrE's internal research library, including maintaining up-to-date research on various research questions relating to the organization’s work. In addition, it will support WomenatthecentrE's efforts to create and maintain public legal education resources for survivors of gender-based violence on the legal processes that may affect them or their families.There are two internal initiatives of focus for this project:
1. Transformative Accountability & Justice Initiative (TAJI)
2. Embedding Resilience and Grounding ResistanceComponent 1: TAJI
One aspect of WomenatthecentrE's work is the Transformative Accountability & Justice Initiative (TAJI), an alternative model of justice for survivors of sexual violence. The research priorities for this project include maintaining up-to-date, accessible information on what survivors are entitled to in terms of awareness of alternatives to justice, and any changes to legislation that would impact the project. The deliverable for this part of the project will be a plain language reference guide outlining options for sexual violence survivors in pursing alternative dispute resolution and transformative justice processes outside of the criminal law system. The reference guide will include plain language information about applicable legislation affecting survivors of sexual violence in relation to their options in pursuing justice.Research questions to begin with:
- What pathways to justice exist for survivors of gender-based violence in Canada? When looking at pathways outside of the criminal justice system, how would one access them, and what can they expect in the process?
- If someone chooses to engage in the criminal legal system following gender-based violence, what rights are they entitled to in accessing information about alternative forms of justice?
- How are the rights of survivors of gender-based violence ensured in the different pathways to justice?Component 2: Human Trafficking Research
Additionally, WomenatthecentrE was recently funded for a project called Embedding Resilience and Grounding Resistance to combat human trafficking and actively implement changes in the legal discourse and media coverage of human trafficking alongside providing survivor-led support to survivors of human trafficking. The project would benefit from legal research support in terms of understanding the breadth of legislation targeting human trafficking across Canada so that trainings and support services can be effectively developed. The deliverable for this research area will be a plain language memo outlining legislation affecting survivors of human trafficking (such as Sections 279.01-279.04 of the Criminal Code of Canada, Section 18 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, and other relevant sources identified through the research process).Starting research questions:
- What laws in Canada criminalize human trafficking?
- How are human trafficking laws operating in court? Who is being prosecuted and who is not?For both Component 1 and Component 2, students are encouraged to attend relevant meetings as they occur with WomenatthecentrE to determine research areas of need and priorities for PLE materials. WomenatthecentrE will invite students to relevant meetings whenever possible by communicating with the lawyer supervisor, or with the students directly. If the staff at WomenatthecentrE have specific questions they would like the students to address, they will communicate them through meetings or via email.PLE Component
WomenatthecentrE also requests law student support for creating resources for survivors connected through our membership program on legal subjects including information for self-representing, what survivors should expect during criminal and/or civil court proceedings, and what options survivors have when pursuing justice and accountability for gender-based violence. Ideally, these resources would be presented in a way that WomenatthecentrE could disseminate with all of their members and the public. Students will work closely with WomenatthecentrE to determine which information gathered through the research process will be used to create PLE materials, based on need and time permitting, if/when components 1 & 2 are complete.In addition to these examples, other projects at WomenatthecentrE will likely have overlapping legal research needs, which will offer students an opportunity to pursue related areas of research as they arise within the organization (assuming time and resources permit this).
Student volunteers are responsible for staying ahead of trends in the legal areas that impact WomenatthecentrE's work, collaborating with each other to identify and summarize relevant research, attending relevant project-specific meetings (provided it is possible alongside the students’ school schedule), and preparing materials to act as resources on the research they conduct.
- Students will work with the Lawyer Supervisor(s) to develop a work plan to establish the division of work, timelines, final deliverables, and deadlines
- Attend relevant WomenatthecentrE meetings (for the TAJI and Embedding Resilience and Grounding Resistance) whenever possible
- Conduct research and compile legal information related to the areas identified by the Partner Organization (and outlined in the project description)
- Consult with Lawyer Supervisor(s) as reasonably needed as questions arise
- Ensure the legal information is concise and presented in accessible, plain languageIn general, students will be responsible for meeting deadlines, keeping open communication with their Lawyer Supervisor(s), and ensuring they are bringing any delays or concerns to the attention of the Lawyer Supervisor and/or Program Coordinator in a timely fashion.
NWT Human Rights Commission – COVID and Jurisdictional Matters Research Project Human Rights, Indigenous, Constitutional 2 Legal Research & Writing, Public Legal Education Upper Years Only Yes Yes http://nwthumanrights.ca/ The Northwest Territories Human Rights Commission (NWT Human Rights Commission) works towards a Territory that is fair, diverse, safe, inclusive, and where everyone is equal. The NWT Human Rights Commission is made up of three independent parts:
(1) Commission Members
Commission Members are appointed by the Legislative Assembly for a term of four years. Commission members are selected based on their interest in, and sensitivity to, human rights. They are from different communities in the NWT and work part-time for the Commission. Commission members are responsible for education and promotion activities. They are not involved in the complaint process until the point that a complaint is referred for adjudication. At that point the Commission may become a party at the hearing.
(2) Director
The Executive Director of Human Rights is appointed by the Legislative Assembly and is responsible for the administration of the complaint process and the operations of the Commission office. The Director also acts as Secretary to the Commission.
(3) Adjudicators
The NWT Human Rights Adjudication Panel is a separate and independent agency which hears complaints referred by the Director. The Adjudication Panel also hears appeals of the Director’s decisions to dismiss complaints. Adjudicators are part-time and are appointment by the Legislative Assembly.Canadian human rights jurisdiction is divided into federal and provincial authority as outlined by sections 91 and 92 of the Constitution Act. In practice the determination of jurisdiction can be complex, especially in the case of Aboriginal service operations in self-governing Indigenous communities. The demarcation between human rights jurisdictions—particularly the NWT and the Canadian Human Rights Commissions—are often unclear.The Commission is seeking a contribute to an existing research project by updating and extending it with current legal research to clarify these jurisdictional boundaries. The research on jurisdiction may also be extended into questions dealing with specific areas of jurisdiction that arise in the human rights complaint process, including the overlapping jurisdiction of other administrative bodies.The Commission would like to see the research transformed into plain language materials for Commission members and the public, which outline their respective responsibilities both when a party to a complaint or having carriage of a complaint.
The student will be responsible for conducting legal/caselaw research and drafting memos summarizing their research. The student will also provide case comments, and complete research assignments, in addition to plain language materials. The student will be working closely with the student on the NWT Human Rights Commission COVID-19 and Human Rights project.
NWT Human Rights Commission – COVID-19 and Human Rights Research Project Human Rights, Indigenous, Constitutional 2 Legal Research & Writing, Public Legal Education N/A Yes Yes http://nwthumanrights.ca/ The Northwest Territories Human Rights Commission (NWT Human Rights Commission) works towards a Territory that is fair, diverse, safe, inclusive, and where everyone is equal. The NWT Human Rights Commission is made up of three independent parts:
(1) Commission Members
Commission Members are appointed by the Legislative Assembly for a term of four years. Commission members are selected based on their interest in, and sensitivity to, human rights. They are from different communities in the NWT and work part-time for the Commission. Commission members are responsible for education and promotion activities. They are not involved in the complaint process until the point that a complaint is referred for adjudication. At that point the Commission may become a party at the hearing.
(2) Director
The Executive Director of Human Rights is appointed by the Legislative Assembly and is responsible for the administration of the complaint process and the operations of the Commission office. The Director also acts as Secretary to the Commission.
(3) Adjudicators
The NWT Human Rights Adjudication Panel is a separate and independent agency which hears complaints referred by the Director. The Adjudication Panel also hears appeals of the Director’s decisions to dismiss complaints. Adjudicators are part-time and are appointment by the Legislative Assembly.In the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic, the Commission is interested in research about how the pandemic affects human rights. Some critics say that the most vulnerable persons in society are now even more vulnerable to human rights abuses. The Commission would like to know more in the area of how the pandemic has affected human rights generally, and also specifically on race, disability and family status grounds and in the areas of employment, public services and residential tenancies.Another consideration in the research should focus on “undue hardship” for respondents, has the pandemic changed anything for employers, landlords and public service providers? With people being unable to attend work and rent still due from landlords, what patterns have emerged in human rights law as a result of the pandemic? We will continue to refine the questions as issues arise over the summer.The Commission would like to see the research transformed into plain language materials for Commission members and the public, which outline their respective responsibilities both when a party to a complaint or having carriage of a complaint.
The student will be responsible for conducting legal/caselaw research and drafting memos summarizing their research. The student will also provide case comments, and complete research assignments, in addition to plain language materials. The student will be working closely with the student on the NWT Human Rights Commission Jurisdiction research project.
Newcomer Center of Peel (NCP) – Public Legal Education Project Employment,Immigration & Refugee 2 Public Legal Education N/A Yes No https://www.ncpeel.ca/ Newcomer Centre of Peel (NCP) is a multi-service agency that assists the entire newcomer family in achieving settlement. Through innovation and a progressive attitude, we leverage the broad experience of our staff and community partners to overcome settlement barriers. They strive for equal access to opportunities, enabling immigrants to connect to the enduring values and principles of what defines Canada. NCP, working with funding from Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC); hopes to foster loyalty towards Canada from our new immigrants and their families. Newcomer Centre of Peel (NCP) is a multi-service charitable non-profit organization that assists the entire newcomer family in achieving settlement and integration within the Region of Peel and beyond. NCP offers employment services, counselling services, English training services, business start-up services and comprehensive settlement services.

The NCP is currently seeking a student to support their public legal education program to create tools such as presentations, workshops, webinars, recorded videos, social media/blog posts and plain language resources. This project involves developing material in the areas of family law, tax law, and immigration and employment law.

Students will support Newcomer’s employment programs. The student will be working on researching employment law, such as providing any changes in the Occupational Health and Safety Act related to COVID and the employee right to refuse unsafe work.

Students will conduct legal research on assigned areas of law to create public legal education tools (i.e. videos, presentations, pamphlets, etc.).
Refugee Law Office (RLO) Placement Immigration & Refugee, Human Rights, Constitutional 1 Legal Research & Writing, Client Assistance Upper Years Only, Pre-reqs include being enrolled in, or have completed, at least one course in refugee, immigration, and/or forced migration law and/or international human rights. Yes, however student volunteers will be permitted to participate in-person at the RLO office only subject to the presence of physical-distancing and other safety measures that reduce the risk of the spread and contraction of COVID-19. Measures that will enable students to attend at the office may include plexiglass for client-facing parts of the office, masks, hand sanitizer and reduced numbers of staff present.

The permission for students to attend in-person at the office may be terminated upon such time that either the Provincial government or the University issues directives that make the students’ participation in-person at the office impossible. This may include more stringent directives on gathering sizes, the closing of businesses and places of work, or the suspension of other academic activities.

If in-person activities are cancelled due to directives stated above, then the project will be modified to include only remote-based legal research, preparation of legal memoranda, and other activities suitable to be undertaken virtually while still allowing for the supervision and oversight of the Lawyer Supervisor and Organization Supervisor.

No http://www.legalaid.on.ca/services/help-with-immigration-or-refugee-problems/ The Refugee Law Office (RLO) is a Legal Aid Ontario’s (LAO) refugee and immigration staff office. The RLO is internationally recognized for its legal services provided to vulnerable persons seeking refugee and humanitarian protection in Canada, and for its law reform work. LAO’s Refugee Law Office represents clients for refugee claims, deportation appeals, humanitarian applications, pre-removal risk assessments, Federal Court proceedings, detention reviews, and more. They are experienced in human rights work and refugee advocacy. Students will work directly with RLO staff on case files, including test cases, which may include refugee claims, pre-removal risk assessments (PRRA), humanitarian and compassionate (H&C) applications, temporary resident permits, danger opinions, applications for Ministerial Relief, detention reviews, deportation appeals, judicial review applications.

Work may include legal and/or country of origin research, drafting submissions, Federal Court memos, affidavits and/or client narratives. All legal memoranda and draft submissions will be reviewed and approved by the supervising lawyer.

Students may work directly with clients to help them prepare their case by way of gathering evidence and/or preparing testimony, under supervision of a lawyer or CLW.

Best efforts will be made to ensure students also have an opportunity to observe oral proceedings before the Immigration and Refugee Board and/or Federal Court

Students will undertake all work as outlined above.
Korean Legal Clinic (KLC) Immigration & Housing; Family 2 Public Legal Education N/A Yes No https://koreanlegalclinic.ca/ Founded in 1997, the KCLA is a community of Korean Canadian lawyers dedicated to supporting the personal and professional development of its membership. The KCLA is the voice of the Korean Canadian legal community and the larger Korean Canadian community. They are committed to taking a leadership role in advancing the interests of Korean Canadian lawyers in the legal profession and dedicated to serving and advocating for the interests and well-being of the larger Korean Canadian community. The Korean Canadian Lawyers Association (KCLA) has established the Korean Legal Clinic, which is a new project that seeks to address the specific legal needs of members of Toronto’s growing Korean community.

Students on this project will conduct legal research, prepare public legal education (PLE) presentation materials at seminars, as well as contribute to funding research.

Students will help create client intakes forms which will be used for conducting consultations with those seeking legal help from the Korean Legal Clinic. As many clients will be Korean speaking, the student will translate and record the intake notes for the lawyer. Following these consultations, students will research the legal issues pertaining to the clients and create a legal information database.

Lawyer(s) will be present, and students will research specific legal topics and prepare PLE presentation materials for the lawyers who will deliver the information at monthly seminars. Topics may include small claims, income tax law, labour and employment, family law, immigration law and housing law.

Students will be strongly encouraged to participate in the PLE presentations.

Students will help research for funding for the Korean Legal Clinic, however this aspect of the project will comprise less than 10% of the workplan.

Scocco Law Professional Corporation – Consumer Protection & Rogue Movers Legal Clinic Business, Corporate, Consumer Protection 3 Client Intake and Assistance N/A Yes No www.scoccolaw.ca Scocco Law Professional Corporation ("Scocco Law") is a boutique law practice with a focus on commercial litigation and consumer protection law. Scocco Law is dedicated to promoting access to justice for those who are vulnerable, and cannot afford to pay for justice when a wrong has been committed against them by a business. It is the duty of members of the Law Society of Ontario to promote access to justice, and to improve the overall administration of justice in our province, and nation wide. As of the turn of the 1990s, the Canadian market for the moving of household goods was deregulated, meaning that a moving company does not require a license to operate and transport household goods across Canada. This lack of regulation has permitted bad actors to thrive within the industry, often referred to as “Rogue Movers”, to take advantage of consumers during their move.

A Rogue Mover often engages in a practice that fits the following three stages:
• Stage 1: the mover provides a “lowball” estimate usually based on weight, or space, or some other metric, to entice customers, often attracting individuals from a vulnerable sector looking to move on a budget.
• Stage 2: Everything seems professional until the moving company takes possession of the household goods, usually a “contract” is signed once the moving truck has been fully loaded.
• Stage 3: Upon taking full possession of the consumer’s household goods, the consumer is charged more than 10% of the original estimate in violation of the Consumer Protection Act. The charge usually represents a 200% or greater increase from the original estimate, without any supporting evidence. The consumer is pressured to pay this price or risk losing their household goods.

After the fact, consumers will usually research their moving company to find that they are indeed a Rogue Mover, and thereafter look for ways to make a complaint and seek help. They will usually leave a complaint with the Better Business Bureau, and the Canadian Association of Movers(CAM) as well as post on social media. It is estimated that over 150 complaints are made annually, and unreported incidents are likely many times this number.
Most moving disputes involving a Rogue Mover affect individuals from a vulnerable sector. In some situations, they could no longer afford to live in their current place of residence due to loss of their jobs, loss of family members, divorce or even domestic violence. They might also be moving under time pressure and financial pressure, with limited resources to protect themselves. Furthermore, the value in dispute is often below $5000. It would be difficult for a customer to hire a lawyer since the lawyer’s fees would likely exceed the disputed amount or otherwise the
customer may have difficulty finding a lawyer willing to take on this type of case.

Scocco Law, with the support of interested stakeholders has created a Rogue Movers Legal Clinic to assist clients who have been taken advantage of by Rogue Movers in Canada. The clinic will assist victims by providing them with legal information, legal advice via licensed lawyers, negotiation assistance, and if all fails, litigation support. Consumers who decide that they will require legal assistance can be referred to this new legal clinic. Scocco Law is seeking students to virtually participate in client intake at the clinic.

The students will primarily participate in client intake. A standardized form will be provided for students to gather all of the key information concerning the dispute. Following this, students will have the opportunity to draft correspondence to the moving company, under a lawyer’s supervision, and assist the lawyer with negotiating a resolution of the dispute.

Should it be impossible to negotiate a resolution, students will have the opportunity to support lawyers in drafting statements of claim and motion materials. All materials will be reviewed and signed off by a pro bono lawyer who will go on record for the clients.

• Claims will involve seeking damages for: expenses incurred as a result of the consumer having to replace certain essential goods that were unlawfully detained by the rogue mover, general damages if applicable, and punitive damages.

• Motions will usually be urgent motions pursuant to Rule 44 of the Rules of Civil Procedure. Such motions may be commenced before the Ontario Superior Court of Justice, or the Small Claims Court.

Canadian Civil Liberties Association (CCLA) - Research Project Human Rights, Constitutional, Administrative 4 Legal Research & Writing, Public Legal Education Upper Years Only Yes No http://www.ccla.org/ CCLA fights for the civil liberties,human rights, and democratic freedoms of all people across Canada. They are an independent, national, nongovernmental organization, working in the courts, before legislative committees, in classrooms and in the streets, protecting the rights and freedoms cherished by Canadians and entrenched in our Constitution. Legal research in support of CCLA’s litigation advocacy and public engagement work for fundamental rights and freedoms in Canada.

 

MANDATORY TRAINING DATES

October 1st from 12:30 pm to 2:30 pm

October 6th from 12:30 pm to 2:30 pm

Students will be asked to conduct legal research and prepare memoranda on various topics by the CCLA’s Program Directors. This may include case briefs͕ reviews of draft or proposed legislation, policy reviews and research memoranda on fundamental freedoms, police powers, national security, equality and civil liberties public education.